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International man of stories
Peter Morey

external forces and personal choice’.7 The combination of the material specificities of injustice and the spiritual apprehensions informing his world view – Zoroastrianism tinged with Platonism – at times lend Mistry’s writing a similar aspect to that of the dissident writer Alexander Solzhenitsyn. There is the same tussle of pragmatism and idealism, the same preoccupation with the question of whether ‘environment determines consciousness’ or whether, as a character in Solzhenitsyn’s The First Circle insists: Man is invested from birth with a certain … essence. It is as

in Rohinton Mistry
Open Access (free)
The adolescent girl and the nation
Elleke Boehmer

narratives of self-making from its native sons. In its final scene Waldo, too, dies, though unlike Lyndall he returns to the farm before his death. Their deaths thus have different valencies. If Lyndall’s refusal to endure represents a protest which, however limited, the farmstead cannot countenance and must exclude, Waldo’s death in the bosom of the farm suggests that the reproduction of the society itself has become untenable. The colonial/adult world in which vindictive white men are dominant is a sterile place. It defeats aspirations, repels idealism; it offers no

in Stories of women
Open Access (free)
Sustainability, subject and necessity in Yann Martel’s Life of Pi
Louise Squire

itself ’ (2012: 36). Intriguingly, both Sparrow, who attacks phenomenology from a range of perspectives, and Clark, who notes the weaknesses of its inherited forms, retain some interest in its possible future. For Sparrow, this would mean a return to Hegel’s ‘absolute idealism’, whereby ‘Phenomenology 234 Reading sustainability could transform idealism into a new variant of speculative realism, and thereby forge a subterranean portal to the things themselves’ (2014: 189). Clark considers ‘a new ecophenomenology’, referring to the work of David Wood, whose aim is to

in Literature and sustainability
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Writing home in recent Irish memoirs and autobiographies (John McGahern’s Memoir, Hugo Hamilton’s The Speckled People, Seamus Deane’s Reading in the Dark and John Walsh’s The Falling Angels)
Stephen Regan

complexity of any autobiographical narrative that seeks to capture both the intensity of childhood feelings and the more circumspect nature of adult recollection. It is not surprising, therefore, that initially McGahern appears to invoke the romantic idealism of Wordsworth, for whom the child is father of the man: There are many such lanes all around where I live, and in certain rare moments over the years while walking in these lanes I have come into an extraordinary sense of security, a deep peace, in which I feel that I can live for ever. I suspect it is no more than

in Irish literature since 1990
Open Access (free)
Postcolonial women writers in a transnational frame
Elleke Boehmer

context suggests, Vera is concerned throughout The Stone Virgins heavily to qualify the valorised meanings of ‘independence’, ‘nation’, ‘land’, by plunging her characters without apparent explanation into horrifying situations of civil conflict and physical torture. Even the shreds of idealism that in the earlier novel clung to these terms are obliterated. The mutilated Nonceba, Thenjiwe’s younger sister, alone survives the agonies inflicted upon the community. For the rest, the expectations of independence, with which Mahlatini the store-owner fully identified, are

in Stories of women
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Language, lies and the crisis of representation in Such a Long Journey
Peter Morey

State of Emergency. Likewise, the existence or otherwise of a spiritual realm of ideal forms is not really the issue. Rather, Mistry appears to understand the necessity of some form of idealism to the whole concept of life’s journey: whether it be an ideal of family life, of which the Noble unit inevitably falls short, or the belief that politics ought to be motivated by a sense of social responsibility and altruism instead of self-interest and corruption. Typical of Mistry’s attitude to human belief systems – that they are a bulwark against contingency and chaos – is

in Rohinton Mistry
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Corruption, community and duty in Family Matters
Peter Morey

worlds’, that ‘kingdom of ends’, in Kantian terms, where everything is in its place and nothing contradicts the requirements of reason. It is a mark of Jehangir’s development in the epilogue that he has moved on from such illusory idealism and is coming to terms with the moral complexity of things as they are, just as his father seems determined to journey in the opposite direction. The earlier, more open Yezad at one stage reflects on the need the survivors of partition seem to feel to go on telling their stories: ‘like Indian authors writing about that period

in Rohinton Mistry
The representation of violence in Northern Irish art
Shane Alcobia-Murphy

by Charles Harvey Brewster. Blight’s analysis argues that those who fought in the Civil War 9780719075636_4_017.qxd 16/2/09 302 9:30 AM Page 302 After words experienced conflicting emotions, running ‘from naïveté to mature realism, from romantic idealism to sheer terror, from self-pity to enduring devotion’.70 The specific line taken from Blight cites his observation that combatants often mask ugliness and horror when writing about war, not only as a self-protective measure, but also as a means of shielding loved ones from atrocity: ‘[s

in Irish literature since 1990
Open Access (free)
Culture, criticism, theory since 1990
Scott Brewster

3000. Visitors from the ‘Eastern Island’ come to consult an oracle in Galway, a region where dwells a colony of long-lived and sagacious people. These ancients have long ago outgrown any sense of Irishness; their predecessors had first exported nationalism to the world so successfully that all national problems were solved, and then returned to Galway having lost their unique selling point, only to find that place no longer satisfied their aspirations. Now bound only to realism, this utopia abjures romantic notions of place and nation. The idealism of the much more

in Irish literature since 1990
The structures of migration in Tales from Firozsha Baag
Peter Morey

home coincides with Percy’s return from the village in which he has been working, with the shocking news that Navjeet has been murdered by hostile moneylenders. Jamshed’s cynicism appears momentarily vindicated: is Percy’s idealism any less delusory in a context where violence and brutality are endemic in the feudal power structures of rural India? (In this plotline, ‘Lend Me Your Light’ comes closer to one of the main themes of A Fine Balance than any of the other tales.) Kersi asks, ‘In all of this, was there a lesson for me? To trim my expectations and reactions

in Rohinton Mistry