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Affiliation, allusion, allegory

near exclusion of literal statement; in this, he illustrates an extreme version of the stereotypical Renaissance love poet, who is also, not coincidentally, a figure of the bad poet. Shakespeare’s speaker of Sonnet 130 mocks the clichéd metaphors of sonneteers by emphasizing the reality of his love’s embodiedness, contrasting and privileging her fleshly imperfections against the idealism of the “false compare.” The message is straightforward, with the wit arising from the cleverness of the contrast between reality and poetic idealizing; with Alcyon, the wit is in the

in Spenserian satire

to hir, penurie” (lines 299–300). When Nashe refers to the earlier sources, he uses the allusion to provide a contrast or implied critique of the idealism and innocence of the earlier texts. Where love/Love is found differs importantly but not randomly in these poems. Spenser alters his sources’ box tree into an “Yvie todde.” Leo Spitzer hypothesizes that Spenser’s innovation stems from a “desire not only to acclimate our episode in England, but also to enforce the ‘dormant’ aspect of Love … the statue of Cupid covered with ivy represents then the minimum of Love

in Spenserian satire