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Open Access (free)
Kitty S. Millet

This article has two aims: to examine the effects of victim proximity to crematoria ashes and ash pits both consciously and unconsciously in a subset of Holocaust survivors, those who were incarcerated at the dedicated death camps of Belzec, Sobibor, Treblinka, as well as Auschwitz-Birkenau; and to contrast these effects, the subject positions they produce, with their suppression as the basis both for a strategy of survival during incarceration and for a reimagined identity after the war. Within a cohort of four survivors from Rudolf Reder (Belzec), Esther Raab (Sobibor), Jacob Wiernik (Treblinka) and Shlomo Venezia (Auschwitz), I trace the ways in which discrete memories and senses became constitutive in the formation of the subject prior to and after escape – the experience of liberation – so that essentially two kinds of subjects became visible, the subject in liberation and the subject of ashes. In conjunction with these two kinds of subjects, I introduce the compensatory notion of a third path suggested both by H. G. Adler and Anna Orenstein, also Holocaust survivors, that holds both positions together in one space, the space of literature, preventing the two positions from being stranded in dialectical opposition to each other.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Open Access (free)
Postcolonial governance and the policing of family
Author: Joe Turner

Bordering intimacy is a study of how borders and dominant forms of intimacy, such as family, are central to the governance of postcolonial states such as Britain. The book explores the connected history between contemporary border regimes and the policing of family with the role of borders under European and British empires. Building upon postcolonial, decolonial and black feminist theory, the investigation centres on how colonial bordering is remade in contemporary Britain through appeals to protect, sustain and make family life. Not only was family central to the making of colonial racism but claims to family continue to remake, shore up but also hide the organisation of racialised violence in liberal states. Drawing on historical investigations, the book investigates the continuity of colonial rule in numerous areas of contemporary government – family visa regimes, the policing of sham marriages, counterterror strategies, deprivation of citizenship, policing tactics, integration policy. In doing this, the book re-theorises how we think of the connection between liberal government, race, family, borders and empire. In using Britain as a case, this opens up further insights into the international/global circulations of liberal empire and its relationship to violence.

Tony Fitzpatrick

) live primarily in space, weighted down in the immobile present by the monotony of meaningless time (Bauman, 1998a: 88–9). A raft of policies is therefore brought to bear against vagabonds in order that the tourists’ consumption of both their present and (likely) future status is stimulated. The increase in rates of incarceration is the most obvious way in which the privileged try to insure themselves against the insecurities that they misidentify as emanating from the excluded, and virtually the entire panoply of the security and surveillance industry can be

in After the new social democracy
Open Access (free)
Joe Turner

with the proliferation of mass detention and deportation for ‘irregularised’ migrants, this is a form of criminalisation and incarceration that bypasses the ordinary criminal justice system and expands a racialised state of exception (Hussain 1999). This use of sovereign powers not only bypasses juridical procedures but also parliamentary and civil accountability. For instance, the Special Immigration Appeals Commission (SIAC), which presides over cases of deprivation, works by limiting the information available to defendants and defence lawyers.2 Whilst deprivation

in Bordering intimacy
Open Access (free)
Bordering intimacy
Joe Turner

incarcerated more black men as a percentage of the population than the United States still raises little attention among international politics scholars (Elliot-Cooper 2016; Sturge 2018). Nor how the life chances of many, in terms of education, health, labour market access or immigration status are most powerfully stratified by race (Shilliam 2018; Danewid 2019). Nor how the UK continually polices racialised groups through counter-insurgency tactics born out of colonial war (Sabir 2017; Turner 2018). Where race is studied in Britain it often remains disconnected from

in Bordering intimacy
Open Access (free)
Joe Turner

) The above event, and the narrative of Charlotte Bronte’s Jane Eyre more broadly, provides a compelling theorisation of familial domesticity and the regulation of mobility under the British Empire. Bertha Mason, the subject of the above passage, is presented as the first ‘creole’ wife of Mr Rochester, one of the central protagonists in the novel. Her incarceration 30 Bordering intimacy in the attic of Rochester’s house remains a powerful example of the nature of racialisation and control in Victorian England. This chapter uses the figure of Bertha and her

in Bordering intimacy
Open Access (free)
Joe Turner

incarceration, stop and search, and restrictive immigration policies based on delimiting the movement and freedom of black and Asian men (see Elliott-Cooper 2016). We might consider here how immigration detention rates reflect wider patterns of imprisonment in the UK, where black and Asian men are disproportionately represented by almost exactly double.3 Sexuality and renderings of deviancy play an important role here. It is worth remembering that the hardening of modern racial categorisation and its governance has nearly always taken place around fears of intimacy and

in Bordering intimacy
The victims' struggle for recognition and recurring genocide memories in Namibia
Vilho Amukwaya Shigwedha

concentration camps for the Herero and Nama prisoners. It is therefore possible, one would suspect, that some of the Herero and Nama victims, whose skulls are currently hidden at the old national museum, or their associates whose remains are still missing, were once incarcerated or even died at this site. Therefore, the return of bones to the place associated with bitter memories of physical and emotional abuse of the Herero and Nama people awakens memories of untold atrocities experienced in the German concentration camps. The act of confining human remains to a hostile

in Human remains in society
Robert Fine and Philip Spencer

criticism of other countries. The problem we reference, that of viewing ‘Israel’ and ‘Zionism’ through the lens of the Jewish question, has much in common with the criminalisation of individuals. The criminalisation process has been explored within the discipline of sociology and the sub-discipline of the sociology of deviance. It involves both mechanisms of selection, interpretation, individuation and projection as well as incarceration, isolation

in Antisemitism and the left
Joe Turner

functioned as an occupying colonial force to violently contain, suppress and punish resistance (Jackson 2015). It is significant that in the aftermath of the Brixton Riots, the Scarman Report would eventually admit that the event revealed discriminatory policing tactics against black communities, for example in the use of colonial bordering tactics such as the ‘sus’ vagrancy laws to crush protests or in the mass incarcerations brought about by the authoritarian practices of Operation Swamp (Jackson 2015). However, Lord Scarman also laid the blame for the violence at the

in Bordering intimacy