Search results

You are looking at 1 - 6 of 6 items for :

  • "incarceration" x
  • Manchester Religious Studies x
Clear All
The idioms and risks of defiance in the trial of Margaretha Horn, 1652
Alison Rowlands

the men and most especially the women, who formed the majority of those accused of witchcraft, in bearing the psychological and physical suffering caused by the experience of incarceration, interrogation and perhaps even torture without breaking down and admitting that they were witches. The reluctance of the council to resort to torture rapidly and without restraint, in addition to the knowledge that verdicts of guilt in witch-trials were the exception rather than the rule in Rothenburg, were doubtless crucial in giving many prisoners in the city gaol the strength

in Witchcraft narratives in Germany
Slander and speech about witchcraft
Alison Rowlands

between the parties involved. In addition, a fine could be imposed on the defendant who failed to prove his or her slander – as happened to Leonhart Immell at Wettringen’s court – while short spells of incarceration, and the shaming punishment of carrying a large stone around Rothenburg were imposed more rarely, and for more serious slanders, on men and women, respectively. In cases involving allegations so serious that they risked exposing individuals to the rigours of criminal law procedure and which were proven to be untrue and malicious, the council was willing to

in Witchcraft narratives in Germany
The Catholic challenge during the Thirty Years’ War
Alison Rowlands

less justification for action against any of the twenty-two individuals she claimed to have seen at the dance. Margaretha was finally released from custody without punishment on 8 December 1627. She was then sent to the city hospital, where her religious instruction continued, until 13 February 1628, when she was finally set at liberty after promising to live a good Christian life and after her guardians had, reluctantly, paid the considerable costs incurred by her incarceration.57 It might be argued that the nine-month stay in custody endured by Margaretha

in Witchcraft narratives in Germany
The first child-witch in Rothenburg, 1587
Alison Rowlands

consequences of his story for himself and his mother brought them both nothing but trouble. They both suffered the pressures and terrors of incarceration and interrogation, and the ignominy and agony of physical torture. By telling his story, and then showing THE FIRST CHILD-WITCH IN ROTHENBURG 101 himself unable to maintain consistently whether it had really happened or just been taught to him, Hans also managed to alienate the sympathies of everyone else involved in the case: the other villagers, his own mother, and, ultimately, even the Rothenburg councillors. There is

in Witchcraft narratives in Germany
Gender and contemporary fantasies of witchcraft
Alison Rowlands

five times with thumbscrews during her final interrogation.121 After steadfastly refusing to confess to witchcraft she was released unpunished on 5 October, although the surety she had to swear before leaving gaol listed the allegations the Schürz family had made against her in tones which implied that they were more credible than Catharina’s denials of guilt.122 Mathes Leimbach was not tortured but, being old and infirm, suffered severely from the cold during his incarceration.123 He was released on 9 October but the trial proved to be his financial and physical

in Witchcraft narratives in Germany
Elizabeth Vandiver and Ralph Keen

of good works, arguing haughtily about the One Faith. From these things the Legate easily understood that Luther answered solely in words but held his mind fixed in its errors and opinions. Therefore the Legate said to him that, unless he recanted, he would be given to the censors, at the Pope’s command, to be bound. But Luther had heard that the Legate had a mandate for seizing and incarcerating both him and his comrade Staupitz. For this reason he was full of anxiety. Since Luther was forbidden to return into the Legate’s sight unless he recanted, he began

in Luther’s lives