Search results

Open Access (free)
City DNA, public health and a new urban imaginary
Michael Keith and Andreza Aruska de Souza Santos

individual rights. It is also a space in which time is embedded in geographical practice (as Schwanen and Nixon discuss in Chapter 4 ). Public health systems always balance what is plausible in the immediate present with what might be possible in the near and distant future. These sorts of trade-off and the instabilities of complex systems are as true in cities of the global south as they are in the global north. In this sense health features prominently in ‘development policy’ in the cities of the global south that constitute an increasingly significant proportion of

in Urban transformations and public health in the emergent city
Open Access (free)
Urban transformation and public health in future cities
Michael Keith and Andreza Aruska de Souza Santos

global north and global south alike, reflecting different development ideologies of individual freedoms and very different trajectories of political settlement internationally. Self-monitoring, individual rights, nudging and actuarial risk Wearable devices now offer the opportunity to self-monitor quite detailed measures of health: exercise, diet, heartbeat and so on. But what happens when these devices feed through to third parties – either states or corporates managing the health sector? Looking benevolently both the individual and the state can use such data to

in Urban transformations and public health in the emergent city