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Open Access (free)
Bonnie Evans

support the welfare and care of autistic individuals without forcing them into a wider framework of self-governance. The concept of autism has redefined how we think about individual rights and child rights. If there is another metamorphosis of autism on the horizon, it will be shaped in a very different political and legal climate to that which supported the first autism. The Mental Deficiency Act 1913 and

in The metamorphosis of autism
Open Access (free)
Paul Greenough, Stuart Blume, and Christine Holmberg

need and that coverage should be viewed as a public good. 40 This position blunts accusations that major public health tools like vaccination and its companions ‘surveillance and containment’ are assaults on individual rights, a stance brought into prominence by AIDS activists in the 1980s; 41 these civil liberties concerns have reappeared in the face of counter-terror measures like ‘preparedness’. 42

in The politics of vaccination
Open Access (free)
Balancing the self in the twentieth century
Mark Jackson and Martin D. Moore

rejected at the time, other approaches – most notably increasing the price of alcohol – were put forward as ways to reduce drinking at the population level. At issue was not simply the capacity of individuals to achieve healthy balance. Policy-makers weighed potential for improved health outcomes alongside individual rights, the social equity of reforms, effects on industrial and employment fortunes, Treasury income and electoral considerations. A growing focus on moderation may have expanded public health's target population, but a reliance on health education and ill

in Balancing the self
The origins and endurance of club regulation
Duncan Wilson

test affirmed that ‘the underlying trend in the English courts was that “doctor knows best”’.101 While philosophers took a similarly ‘hands-off’ stance, they did so for different reasons. During the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, work on ethics had formed a major component of philosophy. British philosophers such as David Hume, Jeremy Bentham and John Stuart Mill claimed that acts should be guided by notions of sympathy, natural or individual rights and the utilitarian faith in increasing the happiness of the greatest number of people; and some of these ideas

in The making of British bioethics
Open Access (free)
Perceiving, describing and modelling child development
Bonnie Evans

-specific’ legislation to be passed in the UK, demonstrating the significance of the autism diagnosis to reframing approaches to mental health care, social welfare provision and individual rights in the UK. In 2013, EU Aims, a major initiative to develop new treatments for autism, received the largest grant for any mental health problem in the whole of Europe, revealing the cultural capital and potential for revenue

in The metamorphosis of autism
Martin D. Moore

from financial institutions to public and commercial life and examined the reformulation of auditing practices within government. 12 Such work has also examined the ways in which ‘ordinary’ people came to express desire for greater control over their lives, and to reinterpret collective identities in terms of individual rights. 13 The creation of the NHS had recast health as a basic social right within the public imagination, and demands for professional accountability and patient rights can be seen in the work of patient organisations. 14 These agencies helped to

in Managing diabetes, managing medicine
Bonnie Evans

treatment, but in its description it drew, again, almost wholesale from Wing. This distinction is important as it shows that Wing’s definition of autism entered several different arenas. Within the global expansion taking place in relation to disability rights, Wing’s autism was used to argue that individual rights and social, welfare and education services should be aimed

in The metamorphosis of autism