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crisis was rooted in post-war anxieties about Britain's place in the world and the unfulfilled promises of technological progress. The 1970s pertussis crisis emerged alongside deep concerns about the role and function of the British welfare state. The 2000s MMR crisis flourished in an age of mass media, the internet and mistrust of political and medical authority following a host of scandals. So what of today's crises? They are portrayed as a result of a declining faith in science, the rampant individualism of certain types of parents and a sense that we have

in Vaccinating Britain
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Contextualising colonial and post-colonial nursing

indigenous populations of colonies, establishing small clinics and later hospitals and nurse-training, just as they ‘insinuated new forms of individualism, new regimes of value, new kinds of wealth, new means and relations of production, new religious practices and set in train processes of class formation’.19 Yet it should be noted that the missionaries working in many of the colonies were not necessarily from, nor answerable to the colonial country – for example, medical missions working in South Africa came not only from the UK and Holland but also from Germany, Norway

in Colonial caring

sale of 62,000 copies of his book in the English language, with more in translation, ‘I am ever more convinced that these principles are valid.’ 11 Furthermore, in 1938, Freud and his family moved from Vienna to London in order to escape persecution. Freud’s psychological take on instincts, society and individualism was becoming increasingly well known in Britain, in

in The metamorphosis of autism
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citizenship were not simply a product of an age of consumerism or individualism that is assumed to have developed during the 1970s and under the New Right governments of the 1980s. 35 During immunisation campaigns in the 1940s questions were raised about the role and responsibility of citizens for their own and their families’ health. Similarly, the technologies of managing risk, often attributed to the 1970s and beyond, were present in an earlier period. 36 Many of the facets of a supposed golden age of technocracy existed both before and after the heyday period of the

in Vaccinating Britain
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Perceiving, describing and modelling child development

previous individual psychology based around intelligence tests. This generated a new ‘style of reasoning’ about child psychology. In the course of the book, I refer to this as ‘spectrum-making’ and argue that it has increasingly come to play a part in definitions of childhood and individualism in the late twentieth and early twenty-first century. This new technology of ‘spectrum-making’ directed and drove

in The metamorphosis of autism
A national ethics committee and bioethics during the 1990s

to claims of escalating mistrust’, and caused suspicion to be ‘directed inaccurately in trustworthy persons and institutions’.178 O’Neill specifically claimed that the bioethical emphasis on ‘empowered consumers’ played a major role in escalating mistrust, by encouraging ‘ethically questionable forms of individualism’ and marginalising the other principles and duties that were vital to restoring confidence in professions.179 ‘We need’, she stated, ‘to identify more convincing patterns of ethical reasoning, and more convincing ways of choosing policies and action

in The making of British bioethics

This chapter explores how new techniques were developed to measure 'social impairment' in children in light of the Seebohm reforms of 1968 and other legal changes of the early 1970s. These led to major changes in the organisation of educational and social services. The closure of mental deficiency institutions in the wake of the 1959 Mental Health Act, the Seebohm reforms and the slow integration of all children into the education system were transforming ideas about social work. The new theory of autism and the autistic spectrum provided new models for thinking about human social development that were just as detailed and complex as those presented by the psychoanalysts. Lorna Wing's work was important because she developed a new theory of social development that held both political and scientific sway.

in The metamorphosis of autism