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Thomas Docherty

experience – the Jetztzeit – is denied, then culture is being denied; for culture is the activity of becoming, the educational development (Bildung) of the human into her or his being, and being requires that there be a content to the ‘now-time’, that there be substance and legitimacy in Erlebnis. It did not trouble Benjamin that his movement was rather an elite and not at all a mass educational movement. In a letter to Wyneken, he writes: ‘we are always very few, but we don’t really care about that’.9 My occasional references above to experience cast in terms of a ‘felt

in The new aestheticism
Open Access (free)
Northern Irish fiction after the Troubles
Neal Alexander

Patterson observes that in the present political climate ‘[c]risis management has become indistinguishable from actual government’.2 Patterson’s misgivings, bordering on disillusionment, have been echoed by a number of critics and commentators upon the faltering ‘peace process’, who suggest that whilst the outward signs of conflict have diminished considerably its underlying causes remain largely unaddressed. For Richard Bourke these causes are to be traced to a fundamental problem of legitimacy affecting all modern democracies, whereby the principle of majority decision

in Irish literature since 1990
Open Access (free)
Cousins and the changing status of family
Jenny DiPlacidi

This ongoing confusion over the (il)legitimacy of cousin marriage continued for centuries, beyond even Chief Justice Vaughn’s 1669 declaration of the legality of cousin marriage, and especially between secular and spiritual courts because the declaration ‘challenged canon law’. 20 The challenge, however, did little to jeopardise the ecclesiastical courts’ control over marriages between persons within

in Gothic incest
Steve Sohmer

of politics, Shakespeare’s 5.6 has an elusive, almost existential quality. ‘Who’s there?’ is the question of identity which haunts both Faulconbridge and Prince Hamlet. Shakespeare, commencing work on the revision that became Hamlet Q2, remembered his memorial for Henry Carey in King John. The common question tying the two protagonists is legitimacy and the right to

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
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Mother–daughter relations in Paule Constant’s fiction
Gill Rye

resulting ambivalences that surround real mother–daughter relations. On the other hand, however, the confidences the four women exchange during the morning they spend together mean that they reveal to each other something of the pain of the private selves behind their public identities: despite their mutual dislike, Gloria puts her Mother–daughter relations in Constant’s fiction  arms round a tearful Babette in order to comfort her, Aurore looks after the alcoholic Lola, and, in turn, Lola helps Aurore to recognise the legitimacy of her own pain. Furthermore, the

in Women’s writing in contemporary France
Open Access (free)
Aesthetics, fragmentation and community
Simon Malpas

. . . . There is no longer a Spirit of the world, nor is there any history before whose tribunal one could stand.25 For many contemporary theorists, the ‘grand narratives’ of modernity (to borrow Lyotard’s phrase) no longer have any legitimacy when it comes to thinking and organising the world, experience and history. In this vein, Zygmunt Bauman argues that the ‘deepest meaning conveyed by the idea of globalisation is that of the indeterminate, 90 Positions unruly and self-propelled character of world affairs; the absence of a centre, of a controlling desk, of a board of

in The new aestheticism
The return of the repressed in Roddy Doyle’s Paula Spencer
Jennifer M. Jeffers

dominate and the powerlessness of wives which make them legitimate outlets for aggression which cannot be vented on others’. Typically, however, such issues and those relating to men’s greater cultural value, and the legitimacy of their dominance, are ignored.18 There is also ‘implicit colluding’ on the part of the government officials with those who commit domestic violence; only one in five women, in a recent study on domestic violence, actually report violence to the Gardai. The women in the study stated that the men who committed the violence 9780719075636

in Irish literature since 1990
Open Access (free)
Colonial body into postcolonial narrative
Elleke Boehmer

BOEHMER Makeup 3/22/05 2:55 PM Page 127 John's G5:Users:john:Public:John's Mac: John's Job 7 Transfiguring: colonial body into postcolonial narrative to get me out of the belly of my patriarchal mother . . . [distance] my eye from her enough so as to see her in a different way, not fragmented into her metaphoric parts. Crossing through the symbol while I am writing. An exercise in deconditioning that allows me to acknowledge my own legitimacy. The means whereby every woman tries to exist; to be illegitimate no more. (Nicole Brossard, These Our Mothers)1 The

in Stories of women
Open Access (free)
Female sexual agency and male victims
Jenny DiPlacidi

mother in the incest scene, causing disagreement between scholars such as Robert Miles and Clery regarding the play’s subversiveness or adherence to social and political institutions. 28 Regardless of the play’s intention to uphold or ridicule the legitimacy of government and religious institutions, the figure of the mother, in her sexual agency, reveals anxieties about the female body as capable of having aggressive

in Gothic incest
Open Access (free)
An introduction
John J. Joughin and Simon Malpas

scientific or theological rationality (the higher faculties). The implication of his arguments, however, is that these two powers are inextricably imbricated, and it is this implication that is taken up by Kant and modernity. It is with Kant that aesthetics takes on its distinctly modern trappings. According to Hans-Georg Gadamer, aesthetics after the Critique of Judgement is no longer a mere critique of taste in the sense that taste is the object of critical judgement by an observer. It is a critique of critique; that is, it is concerned with the legitimacy of such a

in The new aestheticism