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Roman ‘tyranny’ and radical Catholic opposition
S.J. Barnett

legitimacy and, as with any other state, partly upon political alliance. Such a situation would undoubtedly – as the Curia certainly realized – have given more confidence to those pressing for autonomous reform of Churches of sovereign states. Reform of sovereign Churches could come in many guises, with spiritual and political but also economic consequences. With a politically much weaker Curia, unilateral reform might be more likely to entail a much increased intervention in the finances and administration of the considerable landed interests of the Church in most Italian

in The Enlightenment and religion
Laura Stark

people strove to gain by working magic and how magical acts were justified through different types of discourse, we learn much about early modern notions of personhood. The desires and impulses expressed through sorcery were framed within historical and culturally-specific ideas concerning legitimacy, entitlement and rights of the individual, the ways in which ego identified with others, the boundaries of the body and self, and how the

in Witchcraft Continued
Alison Forrestal

plea. Whether or not the opinion ascribed to Du Perron was an accurate rendition of his view is of less importance, for our immediate purpose, than the argument it proposed. In any case, the author aimed to sway undecided bishops towards the sentiments supposedly espoused by the late archbishop. His propaganda presented Du Perron as a pro-regular and pro-papal prelate: he had defended the legitimacy and utility of privileges against those who solicited his support in opposing them on the basis that such hostility was a direct attack on the pope whom Du Perron had

in Fathers, pastors and kings
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black magic and bogeymen in Northern Ireland, 1973–74
Richard Jenkins

. This uncertainty should also be understood in the context of the prorogation of the local parliament, Stormont, by the British government in December 1972. The Protestants’ bulwark, and the source of the legitimacy of their local sovereignty, had been removed at a stroke. Further themes, which emerged in the black magic rumours and the church material, and which there is no space to discuss here, mingle in drugs and sex. These dramatize

in Witchcraft Continued
Attitudes towards subversive movements and violent organisations
Ami Pedahzur

become an established reality and therefore a sovereign entity bound to a system of rules, albeit an initially frail judicial structure. Every use of military force against civilians now had genuine potential to harm the public legitimacy of the new Government. The ‘extended criminal justice model’ was consequently acknowledged as an option often necessary for governmental stability both in order to gain legitimacy and to justify the expulsion of violent antagonists. As for the motive behind the identification of Lehi as a terrorist organisation

in The Israeli response to Jewish extremism and violence
The social sphere
Ami Pedahzur

national symbols and key values of the state. This is a necessary condition for guaranteeing the legitimacy of the governing polity and its stability. 1 This process of socialisation applies to totalitarian forms of government that, by means of political indoctrination, succeed in somewhat reducing the need for the coercive–violent mechanisms at their disposal. Democracies, too, are interested in inculcating and sustaining, by means of both formal and informal socialisation, the political conceptions basic to the ruling polity. 2 The discourse

in The Israeli response to Jewish extremism and violence
Open Access (free)
The ‘defending democracy’ in Israel – a framework of analysis
Ami Pedahzur

of Gush Emunim when, following the detection of the Jewish Underground, it became subject to a deep ideological crisis, indicating the downfall of the radical constructivist perspective. The void left by the decline of Gush Emunim was quickly filled by even more extreme hawkish elements which, at the time of the peace process spearheaded by the second Rabin administration, cast serious doubt on the government’s legitimacy and launched a campaign of de-legitimisation against the incumbent leader of that administration. Surprisingly, both these movements, and

in The Israeli response to Jewish extremism and violence
Ami Pedahzur

because, as noted earlier, in the absence of this type of accountability, state legitimacy as well as its moral stature is put at risk. On the whole, the ‘pro-democratic civil society’ embraces the sum of organisations whose declared goal is the fortification of democracy. This group is internally divided into two subgroups according to the target of their activities, i.e. civil society type I and type II groups. Nonetheless, it is important to point out that despite this typology of organisations according to the target of their activities

in The Israeli response to Jewish extremism and violence
Alison Forrestal

application subdivides ecclesiastical gallicanism, however, according to the institutional structures of the French church, so that the specific term ‘episcopal gallicanism’, in part, represents the special privileges or liberties pertaining to the office of bishop. These privileges were thought to have evolved since the time of the early church, and their defenders were fond of tracing them to their origins in order to defend their legitimacy.5 Equally, however, episcopal gallicanism was characterised by a tough defence of episcopal rights of jurisdiction, so that the

in Fathers, pastors and kings
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The revolt of democratic Christianity and the rise of public opinion
S.J. Barnett

Parlement? He had no choice but to remove the spectacle of public defiance of royal authority from Paris. Why did he not simply arrest its members and so decisively end their defiance? Simply because the political condition of Paris was too unstable. He did not dare risk further inflaming an already very serious situation in which the legitimacy of the government had already been reduced to a dangerously low level. As ever in financial difficulties, his own newly created tame judicial chamber could not provide the requisite legitimacy to raise new taxes. To calm the

in The Enlightenment and religion