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Cousins and the changing status of family
Jenny DiPlacidi

This ongoing confusion over the (il)legitimacy of cousin marriage continued for centuries, beyond even Chief Justice Vaughn’s 1669 declaration of the legality of cousin marriage, and especially between secular and spiritual courts because the declaration ‘challenged canon law’. 20 The challenge, however, did little to jeopardise the ecclesiastical courts’ control over marriages between persons within

in Gothic incest
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Female sexual agency and male victims
Jenny DiPlacidi

mother in the incest scene, causing disagreement between scholars such as Robert Miles and Clery regarding the play’s subversiveness or adherence to social and political institutions. 28 Regardless of the play’s intention to uphold or ridicule the legitimacy of government and religious institutions, the figure of the mother, in her sexual agency, reveals anxieties about the female body as capable of having aggressive

in Gothic incest
Open Access (free)
Romances, novels, and the classifications of Irish Romantic fiction
Christina Morin

’, see Robert Tracy, ‘Maria Edgeworth and Lady Morgan: legality versus legitimacy’, Nineteenth-century fiction , 40.1 (1985), 1–22. 68 On the similarities and differences between The wild Irish girl and St Clair , in particular, see Claire Connolly, ‘The national tale’, in Peter Garside and Karen O'Brien (eds), The Oxford history of the novel in English; volume 2: English and British fiction, 1750–1820 (Oxford: Oxford University

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Father– daughter incest and the economics of exchange
Jenny DiPlacidi

fiction and drama’ (p. 57). 36 Benjamin Bird, ‘Treason and imagination: the anxiety of legitimacy in the subject of the 1760s’, Romanticism , 12:3 (2006), 192–3. Bird argues that what ‘particularly aroused Walpole’s wrath was a case of seditious libel brought by the crown against forty

in Gothic incest
Re-examining paradigms of sibling incest
Jenny DiPlacidi

the hero’s legitimacy has consequences: Enrico discovers Laurette is also legitimate and was orphaned when the Marchese killed her father to steal her inheritance; the money that Enrico inherits is rightfully Laurette’s. Enrico conceals from Laurette the murder of her father by his and the novel ends with their wedding. Such a conclusion effectively negates the potential implications of Enrico

in Gothic incest