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Romances, novels, and the classifications of Irish Romantic fiction
Christina Morin

commanding a significant power over her lover, who must comply, on her desire, to ‘the rules of romance’ and therefore defer marriage for ‘ten years at least’, Cassandra finds herself in a position of liberation unequalled by any of her fellow female characters ( The convent , vol. 2, p. 319). While The convent inscribes the judicious choice of reading material and the cultivation of ‘intelligent detachment’ as the basis of a proper education, therefore, it also celebrates romance's potential both to reveal startling truths about real life and to afford women power in a

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Re-examining paradigms of sibling incest
Jenny DiPlacidi

liberation (the brother frees his sister in defiance of the father’s law), acting as a core of potential villainy, coercion and enslavement. The plot of this novel differs substantially from that of Radcliffe’s first novel; Miles describes it as demonstrating ‘a developed form that feminist critics have come to call the “female Gothic”, a narrative in which a daughter seeks for an

in Gothic incest
Open Access (free)
The cartographic consciousness of Irish gothic fiction
Christina Morin

light of the latter's brief but tempestuous stay in Ireland, undermines the piece's concern with British liberty and suggests instead a veiled commentary on the current state of the Irish nation. In particular, it implicates the Countess of Northumberland, whose attention to political matters was well noted, in the success or failure of the liberation, however limited, of Ireland represented by Pery's demands. Calling on Percy to do justice to her noble forebears who, as Griffith writes, took ‘[l]iberty [as] their crest’, Griffith invites England itself to do justice

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Father– daughter incest and the economics of exchange
Jenny DiPlacidi

of patriarchy or domesticity. Incest is almost always the subtle means of destroying the patriarchal world that imprisons the Gothic heroine, acting as a multifaceted construction encompassing the ambivalence of father–daughter relationships, differing configurations of desire, the potential for liberation in transgressive choices and the dangers of unchecked passions. The heroines’ responses to

in Gothic incest
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Cousins and the changing status of family
Jenny DiPlacidi

of wounded heroes but implies a lessening of sexual power not alluded to in earlier Gothic texts. 88 In a likely unintended consequence, Thomas acknowledges that notions of female obligation and duty will not result in liberation as Camilla never becomes a ‘citizen’ – she exists only as a dependant in

in Gothic incest