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Jane Brooks

adjust to a normal way of living. Some hid their food in their lockers … in case … [ellipses in the original] some wept uncontrollably at times and some wanted to stand to attention if spoken to … We let the patients do their own thing … We had no routine, treated them as gently as possible and accepted some eccentricities.21 Other nurses were posted to care for the liberated civilian inmates of Nazi concentration camps. It is the experiences of nurses who were part of the liberation and later rehabilitation of the inmates at Bergen-­Belsen concentration camp that

in Negotiating nursing
Open Access (free)
Contextualising colonial and post-colonial nursing
Helen Sweet and Sue Hawkins

with the national liberation movements of the 1960s. As it can be construed as covering such a long period of time, colonialism has been divided into several, somewhat arbitrary phases, and Colonial Caring will focus on the later phase, commonly recognised as ‘the modern European colonial project’ or ‘period of New Imperialism’. According to Margaret Kohn, this phase was born of and sustained by the developments in transport and communications in the nineteenth century, through which ‘it became possible to move large numbers of people across the ocean and to maintain

in Colonial caring
Open Access (free)
The hygienic utopia in Jules Verne, Camille Flammarion, and William Morris
Manon Mathias

pain are completely unknown. Everything [on Mars] is more heavenly, more ethereal, more immaterial’. 88 But the release from the body comes at a price. The Martians’ nervous systems are so advanced that they are compared with electrical appliances, 89 and their most sensual impressions are experienced ‘more by the soul rather than by the body’. 90 They live without passion: their liberation from ‘the crudeness of

in Progress and pathology
Mary Warnock, embryos and moral expertise
Duncan Wilson

scientific ethics, Mary Warnock, embryos and moral expertise 145 extending their prior work on acts and omissions and the moral implications of violence and killing. Singer looked at animal experiments in essays and in his book Animal Liberation, in which he drew on civil rights campaigns to propose that ‘we extend to other species the basic principle of equality that most of us recognise should be extended to members of our own species’.33 After claiming that harming animals on account of their presumed inferiority was a form of discrimination known as ‘speciesism

in The making of British bioethics
Jane Brooks

were blamed on the production process rather than on the drug itself.134 It was not until 1945 that a paper appeared in the British Medical Journal informing readers of the possibility of allergic reactions, warning that ‘it is understood that the above is the only occurrence of a reaction of this type [eczema and discharge] to penicillin therapy in more than 30,000 cases treated in the B.L.A. [British Liberation Army]’.135 Despite such ardent confidence in the marvel of penicillin, in its very early days there were some substantial problems. Florey and his team

in Negotiating nursing
Open Access (free)
Jane Brooks

–13 June 1942). 154 Harrison, Medicine and Victory, 98. 155 Khan, ‘Sex in an imperial war zone’, 250. 156 Noakes, Women in the British Army, 35. 157 Fletcher, ‘Sisters behind the wire’, 420. 158 Summers, Angels and Citizens, 159. 159 Joanne Reilly, ‘Cleaner, carer, and occasional dance partner? Writing women back into the liberation of Bergen-­Belsen’, in Jo Reilly, David Cesarani, Tony Kushner and Colin Richmond (eds), Belsen in History and Memory (London: Frank Cass, 1997), 156. Reilly in particular decries the ‘glib’ use of the word ‘sacrifice’, intoned in a

in Negotiating nursing
Duncan Wilson

. In the 1960s, however, ‘the institutional structures of cultural traditionalism started to crumble’, thanks to the Lady Chatterley trial and the ending of moral censorship, the legalisation of abortion and homosexuality, the facilitation of easier divorce, the emergence of the women’s liberation movement, the loss of domestic ideologies in youth culture and growing rebellion against traditional sources of authority.55 Attendance at Protestant churches, Sunday schools and religious rites of passage 72 The making of British bioethics fell away dramatically, and a

in The making of British bioethics