Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 11 items for :

  • "liberation" x
  • Manchester Studies in Imperialism x
Clear All
Open Access (free)
Feminism, anti-colonialism and a forgotten fight for freedom
Alison Donnell

possibilities facing other black women of her time, but her particular focus on issues of gender and women’s liberation, alongside those of racial equality and cultural nationalism, meant that she was challenging structures of inequality that were commonly regarded as less urgent and less central in the intellectual and political agendas of her time. This chapter will offer a reading of Marson

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Open Access (free)
Visions of history, visions of Britain
Stephen Howe

, his memories: ‘They do not liberate me in any sense except that once you have written down something your mind is ready to go further… I would consider liberation from them a grievous loss, irreparable… I do not wish to be liberated from that past and, above all, I do not wish to be liberated from its future.’ 22 Those who wish to be liberated from the past – so he might have added – are

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Organizing principles, 1900–1919
Katie Pickles

Ibid ., 165. 20 Carol Lee Bacchi, Liberation Deferred? The Ideas of the English–Canadian Suffragists, 1877–1918 (Toronto: University of Toronto Press, 1983 ); and ‘Race regeneration and social purity: a study of the social attitudes of Canada’s English-speaking suffragists’, Histoire sociale

in Female imperialism and national identity
Claude McKay’s experience and analysis of Britain
Winston James

peasant from priest and bureaucrat who can no longer egg him on to murder Jews to bolster up their rotten institutions. It might make these United States safe for the Negro. 12 McKay was not alone in advocating black liberation through Bolshevism. But he was one of the first black persons in the US to do so, vigorously

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Open Access (free)
Bill Schwarz

cultural development’. 36 Rather than assuming that emancipation was the gift of London he insisted that the black masses were the agents of their own liberation. 37 This determination to seek equal moral worth in the voice of the black masses of Africa was (and perhaps still is) the source, in part, of Padmore’s ‘magic’. It created the conditions in which ‘the chiefs and yes-men’ of the British empire

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Louis James

was Franz Fanon’s The Wretched of the Earth which, backed by Fanon’s experience of the bloody Algerian war of liberation, asserted that only violence could shake off the psychic legacy of colonialism. At black activist centres like the West Indian Students Union, I was treated with an extraordinary courtesy that my black counterpart would certainly not have met with on the other side of the racial

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Open Access (free)
Sue Thomas

years had worked patiently, had been behind the liberation movements of Africa and the Caribbean’. This ‘idea of himself… had anchored him, had been a kind of livelihood’, 77 which eventually ‘began to feed on itself’. 78 Naipaul’s story feeds on his earlier work – most pointedly his travel narrative ‘The crocodiles of Yamoussoukro’ 79 – in ways which caution against any easy

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Open Access (free)
‘If they treat the Indians humanely, all will be well’
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips, and Shurlee Swain

the franchise. 38 The province of Canada legislated, in language which blended notions of protection and liberation, to establish both a distinct legal status for Indigenous peoples as wards of the government, located outside the privileges of full citizenship and the means by which they could be enfranchised. Introduced in two pieces of legislation passed in the province of Canada in 1850 – An Act for

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Open Access (free)
Crossing the seas
Bill Schwarz

to address the Dialectics of Liberation conference at the Round House, at Chalk Farm in London. 56 He met with C. L. R. James for the first time; he spoke at public meetings in Brixton and Notting Hill; and John La Rose organised a smaller workshop discussion in Hackney. A short while after Brathwaite recalled the impact of Carmichael’s arrival. According to Brathwaite

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Charles V. Reed

performance, which doubled as a final act of defiance. To British officials in India, the ritual arrest of the gaekwad represented the administration of British justice, the liberation of Baroda from a corrupt, Oriental despot. The removal of an ‘autonomous’ prince by means of ambiguous and questionable legal justifications, however, profoundly informed the meanings of another imperial ritual: the royal visit

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911