Search results

You are looking at 1 - 5 of 5 items for :

  • "medical humanities" x
  • Art, Architecture and Visual Culture x
Clear All
Open Access (free)
Light therapy and visual culture in Britain, c. 1890–1940

Soaking up the rays forges a new path for exploring Britain’s fickle love of the light by investigating the beginnings of light therapy in the country from c.1890-1940. Despite rapidly becoming a leading treatment for tuberculosis, rickets and other infections and skin diseases, light therapy was a contentious medical practice. Bodily exposure to light, whether for therapeutic or aesthetic ends, persists as a contested subject to this day: recommended to counter psoriasis and other skin conditions as well as Seasonal Affective Disorder (SAD) and depression; closely linked to notions of beauty, happiness and well-being, fuelling tourism to sunny locales abroad and the tanning industry at home; and yet with repeated health warnings that it is a dangerous carcinogen. By analysing archival photographs, illustrated medical texts, advertisements, lamps, and goggles and their visual representation of how light acted upon the body, Woloshyn assesses their complicated contribution to the founding of light therapy. Soaking up the rays will appeal to those intrigued by medicine’s visual culture, especially academics and students of the histories of art and visual culture, material cultures, medicine, science and technology, and popular culture.

Open Access (free)
Tania Anne Woloshyn

have looked to influential scholars of art history and visual culture, especially those with interests in the history of medicine and the medical humanities. 57 Championing visual approaches to enrich our understanding of medicine, as Jordanova has called for, Soaking Up the Rays urges scholars with an interest in medical history to pay closer attention to its visual culture. This book

in Soaking up the rays
Open Access (free)
Tania Anne Woloshyn

Nina Jablonski, Living Color: The Biological and Social Meaning of Skin Color ( Berkeley, Calif. : University of California Press, 2012); Roberta Bivins, ‘ Ideology and Disease Identity: The Politics of Rickets, 1929–1982 ’, Medical Humanities , 40:1 (2014), 3–10. On race and photography, see Tanya Sheehan, Doctored: The Medicine of Photography in Nineteenth-Century America

in Soaking up the rays
Open Access (free)
Tania Anne Woloshyn

, 22 September 1923, pp. 499–503, at p. 502–3. 30 Reyn, ‘Discussion’, p. 502. 31 See Tania Woloshyn, ‘ Patients Rebuilt: Dr Auguste Rollier’s Heliotherapeutic Portraits, c . 1903–1944 ’, Medical Humanities , 39:1 (2013), 38–46. Rollier insisted, in both the English and French versions

in Soaking up the rays
Open Access (free)
Tania Anne Woloshyn

Woloshyn, ‘ Patients Rebuilt: Dr Auguste Rollier’s Heliotherapeutic Portraits, c . 1903–1944 ’, Medical Humanities , 39:1 (2013), 38–46; on the London Hospital, see Anne Kinloch Jamieson, ‘An Intolerable Affliction: A History of Lupus Vulgaris in Late Nineteenth- and Early Twentieth-Century Britain’ (Ph.D. dissertation, University of Leeds, 2010), p. 51; and on Treloar’s, see William Treloar

in Soaking up the rays