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Reading practices and participation in digital and medieval media

by interdisciplinary engagement with digital media studies continue to offer medieval studies productive ways of rethinking our assumptions about medieval literature and culture. In particular, examining participation in late-medieval literary culture through the perspectives offered by digital media criticism and theory facilitates identification and evaluation of the processes and procedures that shaped how readers engaged with works, interpreted texts, thought of authors, and practised reading. Indeed, focusing on participation in late-medieval English literary

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England
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John Lydgate’s ‘Soteltes for the coronation banquet of Henry VI’

shaped by the materiality of the extracodexical text. Materiality and extracodexical texts Accordingly, this chapter focuses on participatory reading as understood through the critical framework of materiality. Materiality has flourished in medieval studies in recent decades, influenced by new materialisms and especially object-oriented ontology, which provides a framework for understanding the independent agency of things. Object-oriented ontology and speculative realism provide the means to approach medieval historicity outside and around the perspective of the human

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England
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The wall texts of a Percy family manuscript and the Poulys Daunce of St Paul’s Cathedral

in digital media and medieval studies. In particular, I employ the work of media theorist Mark Hansen, whose work has influenced the phenomenological approach to theorizing and analysing digital media. In ‘Wearable space’, an essay that became a chapter in Bodies in code, Hansen begins not phenomenologically, but with a nod to Gilles Deleuze’s Cinema 1: the movement image. He first focuses on a concept introduced by Deleuze, that of the framing function performed by the technical image (a function that includes, for example, the technologies of the photograph, the

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England

’s perceived relentless and violent anti-Judaism, than by any intrinsic lack of literary or cultural value. The variety of new readings generated by this poem which once existed, as Ralph Hanna notes, ‘on the suppressed margins of critical attention, unaccompanied by commentary’,3 testifies to its increasing importance in medieval studies. Yet even as a community of readers work to recuperate Jerusalem from its marginal placement, with few exceptions they continue to read the narrative as thoroughly anti-Judaic.4 My argument concerning the poem is predicated on a

in Pulp fictions of medieval England
Le Bone Florence of Rome and bourgeois self-making

from similar elite milieux. Derek Pearsall, ‘The development of Middle English romance’, Medieval Studies, 27 (1965), 91–116 (p. 92). See A. McIntosh, M. Samuels and M. Benskin, A Linguistic Atlas of Late Medieval England, 4 vols (Aberdeen, 1986), vol. 4, LP 531. This is a variant version of The Child of Bristow, which has been discussed by Barbara Hanawalt, ‘“The Childe of Bristowe” and the making of middle-class adolescence’, in Barbara A. Hanawalt and David Wallace (eds), Bodies and Disciplines: Intersections of Literature and History in Fifteenth-Century England

in Pulp fictions of medieval England
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, see Peterson (“Laurel crown”); for the ongoing payment of the annuity, see Berry and Timings (“Spenser’s pension”). In a recent unpublished paper, Jean R. Brink has argued that Spenser sold his pension to Thomas Walker (Brink, “Spenser’s death revisited,” 49th International Congress on Medieval Studies, Kalamazoo, MI, May 8–11, 2014). Whether Berry and Timings or Brink is correct does not affect my point here, which centers on Spenser’s staying sufficiently in the good graces of the court that his pension was not affected by the uproar over the Complaints volume

in Spenserian satire
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Geoffrey Chaucer’s Troilus and Criseyde and John Lydgate’s Troy Book

medieval studies, see Holly Crocker’s introduction to the postmedieval forum discussion on the status of academic review, ‘Introduction: how open, or, can vulnerability go digital?’ Online at https://postmedieval-forum.com/ forums/forum-ii-states-of-review/introduction/ along with the other essay distributed in this forum. Corrective reading 59 26 See Appendix A for other examples of invitations to emend; that quoted from William Caxton can be found in his publication of the Golden Legend, excerpted in The prologues and epilogues of William Caxton, EETS 176, ed. W. J

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England
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medievalists know, she asserts, that ‘the pleasure of knowledgeable discourses on pleasure’ is what we ‘deliver to our audiences’, we have assumed as our ‘ethical task’ to ‘discipline’ enjoyment out of academic inquiry. In other words, medieval studies (as a modern academic discipline) has invested medieval culture with a seriousness (what Fradenberg calls ‘an ethos of pietas’) that marginalises or denies those aspects of the culture that are predominantly productive of enjoyment.31 So far as popular romance is concerned (a genre Fradenberg does not consider directly), I

in Pulp fictions of medieval England
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The Orcherd of Syon, Titus and Vespasian, and Lydgate’s Siege of Thebes

influenced by the organization of a particular literary form. Similarly, Jeffrey Knight argues that textual composition is related to the materiality of printing only through the choices made by writers to respond to the material form of printing, in Bound to read: compilations, collections, and the making of Renaissance literature (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2013).  5 See Martin Foys, Virtually Anglo-Saxon: old media, new media, and early medieval studies in the late age of print (Gainesville: University Press of Florida, 2007), particularly the

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England
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Thomas of Erceldoune’s prophecy, Eleanor Hull’s Commentary on the penitential Psalms, and Thomas Norton’s Ordinal of alchemy

, England and Scotland, 1286–1603 (London: Palgrave, 2016). 22 Thomas of Erceldoune’s prophecy, xxvff. 23 My use of ‘rhizomatic’ here follows development of the term in Deleuze and Guattari’s A thousand plateaus, referring to a non-hierarchical assemblage. The term has also been usefully explored in medieval studies in relation to manuscript studies, as providing an alternative to the traditional stemmatic view of manuscript relations; see Michael G. Sargent, ‘Organic and cybernetic metaphors for manuscript relations: stemma–cladogram–rhizome–cloud’, in The Pseudo

in Participatory reading in late-medieval England