Dispelling Misconceptions about Sexual Violence against Men and Boys in Conflict and Displacement
Heleen Touquet, Sarah Chynoweth, Sarah Martin, Chen Reis, Henri Myrttinen, Philipp Schulz, Lewis Turner, and David Duriesmith

, 2019 ). This concealment has legal, medical, mental health and other implications for survivors. It also bolsters the misconception that men are violated only when they are completely powerless (i.e. as captives) and may result in differential treatment in legal contexts ( Sellers, 2007 ). Misconception 2: The Most Common Form of Conflict-Related Sexual Violence against Men and Boys Is Anal Rape Among humanitarian aid workers and health providers, sexual

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Gender Equality and Culture in Humanitarian Action
Ricardo Fal-Dutra Santos

. Therefore, transforming cultural values and practices, including gender norms and inequalities, is inevitable in the pursuit of spreading humanitarianism’s own culture. Nonetheless, humanitarianism is also a culture fraught with patriarchal values and practices, such as a hypermasculine working culture that may hinder the professional and personal lives of women working in the sector ( Roth, 2015 : 111–27), negatively impact the mental

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
From the Global to the Local
Elena Fiddian-Qasmiyeh

identified by social workers’ Selection criteria: no men aged 19–60 female-headed households over-60s 1994 Change: stopped mental health programmes Reason given: mental health programmes no longer considered beneficial since they are ‘clinical rather than community-based’ 1995 Change: stopped supplementary feeding programmes To

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Matthew Hunt, Sharon O’Brien, Patrick Cadwell, and Dónal P. O’Mathúna

with conflict-affected groups on the nuances of key concepts (for instance around protection or mental health), and important technical distinctions (e.g. between categories of explosive remnants of war, each requiring specific safe behaviors from civilians). ( TWB, 2017a ) Overcoming language barriers is more difficult for people who speak so-called ‘low-resource languages’ (e.g. Quechua). 6 Trained translators with the requisite language

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
A Military Tactic or Collateral Damage?
Abdulkarim Ekzayez and Ammar Sabouni

Rights, 2020b ; Médecins Sans Frontières, 2016d ). As a result, the health of Madaya’s residents deteriorated with the emergence of communicable diseases, mental health issues and malnutrition. In December 2016, SNHR reported that the GoS targeted the last medical point in the town ( Syrian Network for Human Rights, 2016 ). MSF reported on 7 January 2016 that 23 people, including 6 babies under one year old, had died of starvation with an estimated 320 cases of malnutrition ( Médecins Sans Frontières, 2016d ). The city was also subjected to bombardments and

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Author: Sara De Vido

The book explores the relationship between violence against women on one hand, and the rights to health and reproductive health on the other. It argues that violation of the right to health is a consequence of violence, and that (state) health policies might be a cause of – or create the conditions for – violence against women. It significantly contributes to feminist and international human rights legal scholarship by conceptualising a new ground-breaking idea, violence against women’s health (VAWH), using the Hippocratic paradigm as the backbone of the analysis. The two dimensions of violence at the core of the book – the horizontal, ‘interpersonal’ dimension and the vertical ‘state policies’ dimension – are investigated through around 70 decisions of domestic, regional and international judicial or quasi-judicial bodies (the anamnesis). The concept of VAWH, drawn from the anamnesis, enriches the traditional concept of violence against women with a human rights-based approach to autonomy and a reflection on the pervasiveness of patterns of discrimination (diagnosis). VAWH as theorised in the book allows the reconceptualisation of states’ obligations in an innovative way, by identifying for both dimensions obligations of result, due diligence obligations, and obligations to progressively take steps (treatment). The book eventually asks whether it is not international law itself that is the ultimate cause of VAWH (prognosis).

Open Access (free)
‘Case history’ on violence against women, and against women’s rights to health and to reproductive health
Sara De Vido

equipped to welcome her and her dis­abled child. Even after she did manage to leave the apartment where they lived, her husband continued to stalk and beat her, as ten medical certificates demonstrated. She claimed that her physical integrity, physical and mental health, and life were at 27 DE VIDO 9781526124975 PRINT.indd 27 24/03/2020 11:01 Violence against women’s health in international law serious risk and that she lived in constant fear. Criminal and civil proceedings started against the husband, without success. A.T. complained that the state had failed to

in Violence against women’s health in international law
Open Access (free)
A conceptualisation of violence against women’s health (VAWH)
Sara De Vido

turned to restrictions on abortion, and argued that ‘legally coercing a woman to carry an unwanted pregnancy to term is not only an abuse of her basic human rights, but may also be extremely damaging from a mental health perspective.’15 The use of the adverb ‘legally’ is interesting for my purposes, because it identifies the perpetrator as the state, through its laws and policies. Restrictions on abortion might also have physical effects, especially when a woman decides to undergo ‘unsafe abortions,’ an expression which includes procedures carried out below the minimum

in Violence against women’s health in international law
Open Access (free)
The narrative
Sara De Vido

the following rights as being infringed by VAW: the right to life; the right not to be subject to torture or to cruel, inhuman or degrading treatment or punishment; the right to equal protection according to humanitarian norms in time of international or internal armed conflict; the right to liberty and security of person; the right to equal protection under the law; the right to equality in the family; the right to the highest attainable standard of physical and mental health; the right to just and favourable conditions of work.27 Other rights can be considered

in Violence against women’s health in international law
Open Access (free)
Reconceptualising states’ obligations in countering VAWH
Sara De Vido

, sexual violence and/or incest,134 and in cases of severe malformation of the foetus and risks to the life or health (including mental health) of the pregnant woman. States could still retain room to manoeuvre, the ‘margin of appreciation’ in the jurisprudence of the ECtHR, in deciding to what extent abortion can be limited, provided that, as I argue in this book, denial of abortion does not cause VAWH, in terms of intense suffering, and what the HRC has called a ‘high level of mental anguish,’ connected to an ‘intense stigma and loss of dignity’ for the pregnant woman

in Violence against women’s health in international law