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Katariina Kyrölä

ARGUMENTS The feminist anti-​trigger warning arguments have mostly been made in the context of higher education, touching upon the use of such warnings online and in activist communities only in passing. The majority of such writing and engagement has simultaneously expressed compassion and concern for students struggling with racist, sexist, heterosexist and cis-​sexist or ableist  39 Vulnerability in the trigger warning debates 39 marginalisation, as well as mental health issues and sexual harassment and violence (Freeman et al., 2014; Gay, 2012; Halberstam, 2014a

in The power of vulnerability
Open Access (free)
Trauma, dream and narrative
Victoria Best

hope of mental health, not just in the mind’s spectacular resources, nor in the infinite possibilities of narrative, but in the process of transformation between the two. Lambrichs’s work urges us to consider the alchemy of metamorphosis that takes place between inner and outer worlds, between experience and its internalisation, and between differing forms of symbolic representation, to discover to what extent we can truly possess our many lives. Notes  Louise L. Lambrichs, Journal d’Hannah (Paris: La Différence, ); A ton image (Paris: Olivier/Seuil, ). All

in Women’s writing in contemporary France
The failure and success of a Swedish film diversity initiative
Mara Lee Gerdén

project addressing mental health among immigrants, and how this phenomenon is made invisible and thus extremely difficult to approach. And lastly, the project of artist Aida Chehrehgosha could be seen as part of an ongoing artistic project of hers approaching the family, this time with a focus on the intra-​generational aspects through which histories of pain and love are handed down. The ambitious aim of developing a film project over one year was to be realised with a series of rapid and professional networking encounters, workshops and seminars. The budget was

in The power of vulnerability
Open Access (free)
James Schuyler
David Herd

first of numerous similar episodes in Schuyler’s life. His mental health was quite frequently fragile, such that, as William Corbett observes in the Selected Letters, he was unable, after 1961, to hold down regular employment, and such that through the 1970s and the first half of the 1980s, he was several times hospitalised (SL, 135). During one such period of hospitalization in 1975, he wrote ‘The Payne Whitney Poems’, subsequently published in his 1980 collection The Morning of the Poem. In that short, deeply moving, diary-like cycle, Schuyler presents in miniature

in Enthusiast!
Open Access (free)
Sara Haslam

speaking, especially if from different time zones abroad?).22 Modernist writers employed it to make some of these challenges. Men and women could be close together, at night, through sound if not through sight and touch. In A Call this version of the challenge proves disastrous for the mental health of at least one protagonist.23 In A Call, as Etta and Leicester hover together, he certainly unsure as to what happens next, the telephone rings. In the confusing darkness Etta tells him to answer it, pretending to be a footman. She has begun to walk upstairs. Grimshaw is on

in Fragmenting modernism
Open Access (free)
Sara Haslam

couldn’t talk, and he dropped into his bed faintly aware of his friend’s efforts to loosen his clothes. He had, he knew, carried the suppression of thought in his conscious mind so far that his unconscious self had taken command and had, for the time, paralysed both his body and his mind. (pp. 79–80) 52 Fragmenting modernism This is the description of a nervous breakdown. W. H. R. Rivers wrote in 1920 that ‘mental health depends on the presence of a state of equilibrium between instinctive tendencies and the forces by which they are controlled’,29 and in the

in Fragmenting modernism
Open Access (free)
Sara Haslam

trying to avoid his old regiment, the 9th Welch. In December 1916, having heard that he probably would be assigned there, he found himself back in hospital due to his lungs. On this occasion he wrote to Masterman saying ‘I lie awake & perceive the ward full of Huns of forbidding aspect . . . I am in short rather ill and sometimes doubt my own sanity – indeed, quite frequently I do’,68 revealing that the state of his physical health is causing him less real problem than that of his mental health. His nightmares, and daymares, have become more to the point. When Ford was

in Fragmenting modernism