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The intellectual influence of non-medical research on policy and practice in the Colonial Medical Service in Tanganyika and Uganda

Orgies of drink and women: ethnography, morality and STIs in Buhaya When British officials displaced their German predecessors in Buhaya, in north-west Tanganyika, during the First World War, they found themselves in possession of a territory with several unusual features. The introduction of the plantain or cooking banana a thousand or more years before had permitted the

in Beyond the state

free and rational society governed by social contract. The enslavement of Africans, on the other hand, conformed with natural law since it derived from the legitimate purchase and domination of captives of war. Such slaves were private property and were subject to the same valid morality. 23 The sources of anti-slavery thought in the eighteenth century were diverse and complex. British

in The other empire
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by many Britons, and continued to hold in high esteem the achievements of Indian culture. Progress for her depended less on the civilizing mission of the British, than on a reawakening of ancient morality: Our missionaries are very apt to split upon this rock, and in order to place our religion in the brightest light … they

in The other empire
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Free State. A Royal Scots Fusilier explained: ‘Life here is provocative of every vice, not for vice’s sake, but by way of protest against the aggressive morality not only of the Boers, but also of the British who are only different from them in name and birthplace. They have all the narrowness of Scottish elders without their good qualities.’ 13 The rebellion was triggered by local events, namely the

in The Victorian soldier in Africa
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Feminism, anti-colonialism and a forgotten fight for freedom

. 17 At a time when eurocentric ideals of beauty, morality and culture were championed in middle-class Jamaica, Marson sought to position a new politics of identity through the connection to Africa. In the face of ‘Many Jamaicans [who] would like to rewrite the social history of Jamaica to prove that they have no Negro blood in their veins’, Marson

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Organizing principles, 1900–1919

convinced politicians of the worth of giving women the vote. 83 That being the case, as the largest patriotic organization in the Empire, along with other organizations such as the YWCA and the Red Cross, the IODE made a strong contribution here. Always at the forefront were the issues of motherhood and morality, and of seeking justice for the men in the forces overseas. During the IODE’s first years

in Female imperialism and national identity
Defending Cold War Canada

; individual human beings were unimportant, and ‘a Communistic government is inevitably a tyrannical one’. 26 Communism was seen as a force undermining Christianity, the churches and morality. Echoes in 1948 published a drawing with the inscription ‘An indication of Communist publicity. Communist workmen throw an effigy of Jesus Christ and of the Sacrament into a garbage pit.’ 27 This cartoon

in Female imperialism and national identity
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giants in postwar Britain that the Beveridge Report attempted to tackle, although Beveridge was a little more reticent about the morality. 100 Ibid. , pp. 30, 39, 44. 101 H.O. Davies, ‘The Way Out’. A Letter Addressed (by permission) to The Earl of

in The other empire
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subverted the normal boundaries of Christian and racial morality: [T]here are hideous cases of the most revolting incest occasionally coming to the surface, which tell how near the level of the brutes some of the masses of our people are fallen.… Enter one of these houses, and from cellar to garret it is packed with people, each floor let and

in The other empire

British people.’ 6 But Fisher did not engage with the morality of ‘common trusteeship’: Australia’s interests lay in gaining delegates’ backing on exclusionary policies grounded in race. He wanted no direct allusions to the civil rights of Aborigines, and sought overt imperial sympathy for keeping borders closed to non-European migrants, whether from countries of the Empire or not. Ward agreed. From New

in Equal subjects, unequal rights