Search results

You are looking at 1 - 7 of 7 items for :

  • "motherland" x
  • Manchester Studies in Imperialism x
Clear All
Matthew M. Heaton

could not rival that of the ‘imperial motherland’. Psychiatric facilities in Nigeria were particularly unpleasant, characterised as overcrowded, understaffed and offering nothing in the way of therapeutic care. 16 The disparity was stark enough that one Nigerian official queried, I presume there must be full legal sanction for

in Beyond the state
Open Access (free)
Global Britishness and settler cultures in South Africa and New Zealand
Charles V. Reed

and action could heighten the already natural tendency to imagine and construct über-British societies on the edges of the world. Settlers competed with the motherland and other cores to make ‘better Britains’ and to be more perfect Britishers – whether by building a prosperous commercial entrepôt at the Cape of Good Hope or by imagining a more democratic – even classless – society in New Zealand

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
Daughters of the Empire, mothers in their own homes, 1929–45
Katie Pickles

and constructed places as mothers. On a wider – metaphorical – level there was the rhetoric of ‘Canada prides herself on having been on the side of the motherland and since war began has paid her way, has the largest volunteer fighting force in the World, the largest small arms factory in the Empire, and has been privileged to share in the great glories as the daughter who is mistress on her own house

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)
Feminism, anti-colonialism and a forgotten fight for freedom
Alison Donnell

. Although Marson did not return to London until 1964, just one year before her death and two years before the formation of the Caribbean Artists Movement, there is a sense in which Britain, as the colonial motherland, had been the catalyst for her many journeys, providing both the political and intellectual impetus behind the internationalism and transnationalism that was so crucial to the freedom movements

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Open Access (free)
Empire, migration and the 1928 English Schoolgirl Tour
Katie Pickles

see the children show us England on the map, and on being asked, the (to us) somewhat puzzling question “what is the other name of that country?” to hear them all respond without hesitation, “Our Motherland”. What a queer world it is!’ 62 Assimilation was at once inevitable and quaint. At the end of the tour there was time for the girls to reflect upon and consolidate their experiences. The

in Female imperialism and national identity
The canadianizing 1920s
Katie Pickles

contact with the SOSBW and British women’s voluntary societies, and again considered the possibility of an office in London. In the words of its immigration convener, Mrs Graham Thompson, ‘How much it would help the Order to keep in touch with the movements of imperial women in the Motherland to have its representatives there, with the SOSBW and tap potential British Immigrants at their source.’ 39

in Female imperialism and national identity
Defending Cold War Canada
Katie Pickles

It rested upon the four freedoms – freedoms of worship and speech, and freedom from want and fear. The IODE modelled its concept of democracy on its perception of British democracy, and patriotically stated that it was ‘owed to the Motherland to keep Canada free’. 10 The words of the provincial president of Ontario in her 1949 annual speech captured that sense of strong attachment to Britain

in Female imperialism and national identity