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The Algerian war and the ‘emancipation’ of Muslim women, 1954–62
Author: Neil Macmaster

In May 1958, and four years into the Algerian War of Independence, a revolt again appropriated the revolutionary and republican symbolism of the French Revolution by seizing power through a Committee of Public Safety. This book explores why a repressive colonial system that had for over a century maintained the material and intellectual backwardness of Algerian women now turned to an extensive programme of 'emancipation'. After a brief background sketch of the situation of Algerian women during the post-war decade, it discusses the various factors contributed to the emergence of the first significant women's organisations in the main urban centres. It was only after the outbreak of the rebellion in 1954 and the arrival of many hundreds of wives of army officers that the model of female interventionism became dramatically activated. The French military intervention in Algeria during 1954-1962 derived its force from the Orientalist current in European colonialism and also seemed to foreshadow the revival of global Islamophobia after 1979 and the eventual moves to 'liberate' Muslim societies by US-led neo-imperialism in Afghanistan and Iraq. For the women of Bordj Okhriss, as throughout Algeria, the French army represented a dangerous and powerful force associated with mass destruction, brutality and rape. The central contradiction facing the mobile socio-medical teams teams was how to gain the trust of Algerian women and to bring them social progress and emancipation when they themselves were part of an army that had destroyed their villages and driven them into refugee camps.

Open Access (free)
Women, internal colonization and indigenous peoples
Katie Pickles

been assimilated to become a part of Canada as the IODE sees it. In a postcolonial climate of greater acceptance of difference and state promotion of multiculturalism, the IODE’s earlier vision for the Canadian north is outmoded. 50 There is no longer a threat of a Russian invasion, and economic ventures are more the responsibility of private companies. Organized opposition by indigenous peoples has

in Female imperialism and national identity
The canadianizing 1920s
Katie Pickles

, (Ottawa: Canadian Historical Association with the Government of Canada’s Multicultural Programme, 1991). 16 See Kent Fedorowich, Unfit for Heroes: Reconstruction and Soldier Settlement in the Empire Between the Wars (Manchester: Manchester University Press, 1995 ). 17

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)
Katie Pickles

history, and Canada as a nation dramatically changed. From mimicking a British imperial centre in population, economics, politics and culture, Canada has moved beyond dominion status to become a globally powerful multicultural nation state, whose identity is centred in its geographical location. French Canadian identity is now partially recognized, with on-going tension and controversy over the right to self

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)
The failure of history
Neil Macmaster

political consequences’.10 By the early twenty-first century it might have been expected that educated political elites would have been highly attuned to the negative impacts of past colonial empires that had unthinkingly imposed their own values on ‘inferior’ subject peoples. In the post-colonial age of multiculturalism, anti-racism and universal rights it was widely acknowledged that it was no longer morally or politically right to steamroller the culture of other ‘races’ or peoples. But since 9/11 there has been a significant revival among academic historians and

in Burning the veil
Organizing principles, 1900–1919
Katie Pickles

. 11 Howard Palmer, ‘Reluctant hosts: Anglo-Canadian views of multiculturalism in the twentieth century’, in Gerald Tulchinsky (ed.), Immigration in Canada: Historical Perspectives (Toronto: Copp Clark Longman Ltd, 1994 ), 297–333, at 300. 12 James S. Woodsworth, Strangers at Our Gates

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)
Sue Thomas

multiculturalism as a neocolonising import from the United States to Britain. Yet, too, in terms of the clash of civilisations theory through which Naipaul currently interprets world history, it is a policy ‘fostered by Islamic groups’. In 2001 he mocks the policy as ‘multi-culti’, mobilising again, as with his denunciation of Black Power politics, a belittling discourse of redemptive desire and unreason, and

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Daughters of the Empire, mothers in their own homes, 1929–45
Katie Pickles

, ‘The Department of Education.’ That was at the beginning of what we are now in, bilingualism and multiculturalism and so on, you know.     Four or five years later, I stood on the platform of the CPR [Canadian Pacific Railway] Station, out the back of town here, and the train was leaving for Halifax. It was a train full of soldiers, and the boys were

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)
Charles V. Reed

Philip allegedly asked them if they ‘still [threw] spears at each other’. 16 From the perspective of the monarchy and the Australian planners, this encounter was meant to convey British and Australian reconciliation with the Aborigine population and evidence of Australia’s modernity and multi-culturalism. 17 Yet within the ritualistic order of the tour the fire

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
Open Access (free)
Crossing the seas
Bill Schwarz

multicultural Britain’. The emigrant experience cast a new way of seeing, in which consciousness both of the imperial past and of the inner forms of the imperial civilisation of the British assumed a new intensity. That this vision cohered is of the first importance, analytically, for the British themselves: it allowed the British to step outside themselves, or outside their own culture or habitus, and to see

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain