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Open Access (free)
Catherine Baker

/post-Ottoman Europe, yet are rarely heard in wider Anglophone theoretical production. Postcoloniality, postsocialism and the politics of knowledge production The Yugoslav region's most widely read theorist, outside south-east European studies, is the Slovenian philosopher Slavoj Žižek, a Lacanian and critical theorist known both for his postcolonial readings of the ‘Europe’/‘Balkan’ division and for his suspicion of multiculturalism. While Žižek came later to balkanism than Bakić-Hayden or Maria Todorova, he transfers this critique into the field

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Mads Qvortrup

speaking world through the vogue for the ‘politically correct’ and ‘multiculturalism’ now dominant in certain faculties of several major American universities … The malignant magic of the grand charlatan is liable to be with us for some time. (O’Brien 2002: 315) Rarely has an erudite man been more misinformed. Rousseau was many things; a vagabond, a note-copier, a poet, a composer, a pedagogue and a political scientist but he was never a multiculturalist, and he certainly did not go along with the liberal secularism of the so-called politically correct. Of course many

in The political philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Open Access (free)
What does race have to do with the Yugoslav region?
Catherine Baker

history might be? 3 Gilroy both calls for a ‘transcultural, international’, non-nation-state-centric mode of black social, intellectual and cultural history inside and outside Europe (Gilroy 1993 : 4) and emphasises that racialised hierarchies of belonging, the legacies of colonialism and slavery, are still circulating the globe in what many Americans and Europeans were then imagining as the supposedly cosmopolitan, multicultural and post-racial present (Gilroy 2004 ); moreover, his anti-essentialism towards race and racism harmonises with the deconstruction of

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Catherine Baker

the aesthetics of transatlantic female celebrity, available across some racialised boundaries to certain women (conventionally attractive to a male heterosexual gaze) who could have many different racial and ethnic identities (Latina; biracial; any spatialised ethnic origin ‘from’ Spanish ‘to’ Iranian; light-skinned but black; dark-haired but white; or not even stated). Pop sometimes signifies their ‘erotic multiculturalism’ (Mcgee 2012 ) sonically with ‘oriental’ strings. Many women from the Balkans might occupy this ambiguous category, where contemporary

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Iseult Honohan

. 1994 . “ Struggles for Recognition in the Democratic Constitutional State .” In Multiculturalism , edited by C. Taylor and A. Gutmann . Princeton : Princeton University Press : 107–148 . Hampton , Jean . 1998 . Political Philosophy . Boulder : Westview . Honohan , Iseult . 2002 . Civic

in Democratic inclusion
Catherine Baker

(Chang 2013b : 142). 13 Chang's difficulties obtaining official data about Chinese migration (beyond those of counting undocumented migrants and those who do not interact with census-taking) indicate statistical practices in Serbia and other post-Yugoslav states are more geared towards existing frames of ethnopolitics rather than recording new multicultural and multiracial categories in society: Serbia's Chinese population, estimated by Chang at 20,000–30,000 – similar to recorded numbers of Macedonians (25,847) or Bulgarians

in Race and the Yugoslav region
Philip Nanton

statement of power in the relationship described. Later in the novel, when Rennie is rescued from jail, her rescuer, an unnamed Canadian diplomat, is described merely as a ‘multicultural functionary’, though she does recognise the necessity of his role in the assuaging of local egos in order for her to be released from prison. In this outsider reading of the frontier, Atwood seems to

in Frontiers of the Caribbean
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Identities and incitements
Saurabh Dube

, an increasingly “aggressive fundamentalisation of existing identities.” 56 Here, it seems to me, that to critically and carefully consider the entwining of these impulses – of the pluralization and fundamentalisation of identities – is to ask and explore how such entanglements straddle the state and its subjects, the nation and its representations, multiculturalism and

in Subjects of modernity
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An introduction
Saurabh Dube

finding varied appropriations and extensions across different continents from at least the 1990s, there have arisen debates and discussions that have been animated by broader considerations of colonial knowledge and postcolonial difference, multicultural politics and cultural identities. 26 Especially influential in these arenas are the writings of Gayatri Spivak, for

in Subjects of modernity
Open Access (free)
Rainer Bauböck

. Liberal theorists like Walzer, Carens and Kymlicka have provided us with rich accounts of immigrants’ claims to membership and multicultural rights based on the idea that the rule of citizens over permanent strangers is a form of tyranny (Walzer 1983 ), that immigrants become over time members of society and democracies must be inclusive for all their members (Carens 1989 ), or that liberal democracies need to integrate immigrants into a shared

in Democratic inclusion