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6 Globalised Ireland, or, contemporary transformations of national identity? G. HONOR FAGAN The influential US magazine Foreign Policy issued a ‘Globalization Index’ in 2001, which, to the surprise of many, found the Republic of Ireland to be at the top of the list.1 The indicators used to construct the index included information technology, finance, trade, travel, ‘politics’ and personal communications, all designed to evaluate the degree of global integration. We learn that ‘Ireland’s strong pro-business policies’ have made the country (or more precisely the

in The end of Irish history?

This article considers the contexts and processes of forensic identification in 2004 post-tsunami Thailand as examples of identity politics. The presence of international forensic teams as carriers of diverse technical expertise overlapped with bureaucratic procedures put in place by the Thai government. The negotiation of unified forensic protocols and the production of estimates of identified nationals straddle biopolitics and thanatocracy. The immense identification task testified on the one hand to an effort to bring individual bodies back to mourning families and national soils, and on the other hand to determining collective ethnic and national bodies, making sense out of an inexorable and disordered dissolution of corporeal as well as political boundaries. Individual and national identities were the subject of competing efforts to bring order to,the chaos, reaffirming the cogency of the body politic by mapping national boundaries abroad. The overwhelming forensic effort required by the exceptional circumstances also brought forward the socio-economic and ethnic disparities of the victims, whose post-mortem treatment and identification traced an indelible divide between us and them.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Critical reflections on the Celtic Tiger

Sexual images and innuendo have become commonplace in contemporary advertising; they often fail to register in any meaningful way with the audience. This book examines the essentially racist stereotypes through which Irish people have conventionally been regarded have been increasingly challenged and even displaced perhaps by a sequence of rather more complimentary perspectives. The various developments that are signified within the figure of the Celtic Tiger might be considered to have radically altered the field of political possibility in Ireland. The enormous cuts in public expenditure that marked this period are held to have established a desirable, stable macroeconomic environment. The Celtic Tiger shows that one can use the rhetoric about 'social solidarity' while actually implementing policies which increase class polarisation. The book discusses the current hegemonic construction of Ireland as an open, cosmopolitan, multicultural, tourist-friendly society. The two central pieces of legislation which currently shape Irish immigration policy are the 1996 Refugee Act and the Immigration Bill of 1999. The book offers a critical examination of the realities of the Celtic Tiger for Irish women. Processes of nation state formation invariably invoke homogeneous narratives of ethnicity and national identity. To invoke a collective subject of contemporary Ireland rhetorically is to make such a strategic utopian political assumption. For the last few hundred years, the Gaeltacht has exemplified the crisis of Irish modernity. Culture becomes capital, and vice versa, while political action increasingly consists of the struggle to maintain democratic autonomy in the face of global market forces.

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diasporas. Rather than posit a false binary and fall into a trap of romantic, pure nationalisms, this chapter draws from empirical evidence to interrogate how Caribbean-Canadians embody multiple, hybridised national identities, and explores the ways in which they draw boundaries around their communities and use dominant discourses to demonstrate national identities that are distinct and pure. The use of

in Sport in the Black Atlantic

. The discourse analysis of political actors’ speeches and debates indicates that Israeli exclusionary policies of asylum have been justified through very ‘classical’ securitising storylines where asylum seekers are constructed in three ways: as a threat to national security, as a disruption of social order, and as a threat to national identity. The analysis of political discourse also shows that in

in Security/ Mobility
South Africa in the post-imperial metropole

chapter6 21/12/04 11:17 am Page 107 6 Transnational productions of Englishness: South Africa in the post-imperial metropole ‘Huge ideological work has to go on every day to produce this mouse that people can recognize as the English.’ Thus observes Stuart Hall, one of the foremost practitioners of black cultural studies in Britain.1 For Hall, the transformation of English national identity began with Margaret Thatcher’s 1979 government. The contemporary production of Englishness became, and continues to be, labour-intensive because England had lost the

in Postcolonial contraventions
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This chapter concludes this book, which concerns the Black Atlantic, a geographic region and a theoretical framework that helps to understand the experiences of a transnational racialized community, and the importance of Black people’s travel. This chapter specifies the cultural and migration flows within Canada, England, the United States, and the Caribbean, and the ways the boundaries around an Afro-Caribbean-Canadian community are made and crossed with special attention paid to race, ethnicity, and gender. In conversations about the Black Atlantic and the Caribbean diaspora, the use of recreational sport to connect migrants to the homeland and each other has been virtually ignored. This chapter shows how the entire text moves beyond the runs, wickets, bowling, and batting of cricket to draw attention to local and deterritorialized community building, transnational travel and social networks, hetero-masculinities and femininities, nostalgia of older adults, historical and contemporary Indo-Afro ethnic antagonism, and persistent national identities that constitute the Afro-Caribbean diaspora and Black identity in Canada. These complexities help us to understand how the Black Atlantic is defined both through its décalages or disjunctures – that is, who is missing or unwelcomed – and also through its unified, shared experiences and cultures.

in Sport in the Black Atlantic
French denaturalisation law on the brink of World War II

process? In other words, how does the bill pertaining to denaturalisation feed on and produce normative divisions that affect the notion of national identity, and, by extension, the notion of national community? The rise of new limits to the notion of national identity during World War II: between security and mobility As stated by the 1939 bill amending

in Security/ Mobility
Racism, immigration and the state

consequence of the labour market dynamism of the Celtic Tiger; a narrative of ethnic and national identity inherited from the process of state formation before and after independence; within the field of international relations, a commitment to constitutional liberalism and the rule of law – this expresses itself in support for the United Nations and the 1951 Convention Relating to the Status of Refugees. Migration in Ireland The two central pieces of legislation which currently shape Irish immigration policy are the 1996 Refugee Act (which was not fully passed until

in The end of Irish history?
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Paul Gilroy’s The Black Atlantic

, where his emphasis falls on a black trans- and anti-national identity as an antidote to the pernicious exclusivisms heralded by black nationalism-as-ethnic-absolutism. Important though it is, Gilroy’s denunciation in ‘There Ain’t No Black’ of a cosily racialist cultural nationalism, shared by right and left, needs revision and supplementation. His denunciation rests on a chapter4 21/12/04 11:00 am Journeying to death Page 77 77 fatalism – there ain’t no black in the Union Jack and there never can be – which ironically operates to leave such racially exclusive

in Postcolonial contraventions