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Greer Vanderbyl, John Albanese, and Hugo F. V. Cardoso

The sourcing of cadavers for North American skeletal reference collections occurred immediately after death and targeted the poor and marginalised. In Europe, collections sourced bodies that were buried and unclaimed after some time in cemeteries with no perpetual care mandate, and may have also targeted the underprivileged. The relationship between socio-economic status (SES) and abandonment was examined in a sample of unclaimed remains (603 adults and 98 children) collected from cemeteries in the city of Lisbon, Portugal, that were incorporated in a collection. Results demonstrate that low SES individuals are not more likely to be abandoned nor to be incorporated in the collection than higher SES individuals. Furthermore, historical data indicate that the poorest were not incorporated into the collection, because of burial practices. Although the accumulation of collections in North America was facilitated by structural violence that targeted the poor and marginalised, this phenomenon seems largely absent in the Lisbon collection.

Human Remains and Violence: An Interdisciplinary Journal
Open Access (free)
Creative legacies
Melanie Giles

whether some of the most iconic bog bodies were accidents, executions, sacrifices or self-offerings. We should not be too concerned: Charles Sanders Peirce himself used the bog to evoke the ever-provisional nature of scientific enquiry that is not ‘standing on the bedrock of fact. It is walking upon a bog, and can only say, this ground seems to hold for the present. Here I will stay till it begins to give way’ (in Hartshorne and Weiss 1994 : V: 589). What we can do, however, is contextualise our bog bodies, in place and in time. Throughout, the book has sought to

in Bog bodies
Duncan Sayer

prepared on the pyre, At the funeral pile he was easily seen, His tunic covered in blood) (Sebo, 2015 ) The circumstances dictated the nature of the ritual and its emphasis; it was designed by a wife and mother, with a focus on her brother. Had this mortuary drama been prepared by Hildeburh’s daughter-in-law it might have looked quite different. Rather than being cremated in the clothes they died in, they might have been dressed in new clothes and with identifiable gravegoods. The visibility of the injuries they inflicted on each other was important to

in Early Anglo-Saxon cemeteries
Jes Wienberg

is also deliberately pursued. World Heritage can thus be designated as glocal; that is, a phenomenon that combines the global and the local. But glocality as a concept is not an exhaustive answer, since the World Heritage Convention with its list of World Heritage sites crosses borders in several respects: in its intentions; in relation to the categories of nature and culture; in respect of World Heritage themes; and with regard to chronology, geography, and engagement. The fundamental intention of the World Heritage Convention is to protect and preserve

in Heritopia
Jes Wienberg

Convention: two assistant directors-general of UNESCO, the engineer Michel Batisse and the lawyer Gérard Bolla. In L’invention du “patrimoine mondial” ( 2003 ) (English: The Invention of “World Heritage” , 2005), they describe a heroic process in which international agents with different interests presented rival proposals that could finally be reconciled with the Convention as a compromise, a process in which they themselves played a crucial role. The synthesis, which placed protection of nature and of culture within the framework of one and the same convention, is

in Heritopia
Was he more than just ‘Dr Took’?
Jonathan R. Trigg

material produced by his network of contemporaries and the interpretations of later antiquaries and scholars to understand the importance of such an individual. The nature of the information provided by Toope comes in the form of reporting what would now be considered archaeological material to the members of his social circle who, like Aubrey, clearly had an archaeological bent. There is also evidence of the fact that Toope was truly a Renaissance man, as can be seen by his further interactions with medical men of the time, such as Robert Boyle, but also in his

in Communities and knowledge production in archaeology
Open Access (free)
Jes Wienberg

gradually permitted humanity to gaze into space, and therefore backwards in time. The material icons of progress include modes of transport such as the sailing ship, the steamship, the train, the car, the aircraft, and the rocket. They encompass forms of communication that join the world together, such as the telegraph, telephone, radio, TV, and the Internet. And they include technologies that permit the construction of ever-higher buildings, which are erected in a spirit of competition between states and major cities and appear to run counter to the laws of nature. In

in Heritopia
Felix Kanitz and Balkan archaeology
Vladimir V. Mihajlović

institutional circles and their strict rules. Archaeological knowledge, as well as scientific knowledge in general, like any other form of knowledge, is ‘a cultural formation, embedded in wider networks of social relations and political power, and shaped by the local environments in which practitioners carry out their tasks’ (Livingstone, 2002: 236; on the social nature of knowledge see Latour, 1996, 2005; Law, 1992). The socio-/geopolitical nature of knowledge that David Livingstone writes about can be clearly seen in the life and work of Felix Kanitz (1829–1904), one of the

in Communities and knowledge production in archaeology
Open Access (free)
Duncan Sayer

(see Figure 1.9 and Figure 3.7 ). Overall, this pattern implies that the configuration B burials were treated differently. Instead of the vertical pattern presented in the centre of the cemetery among the configuration A burials, the configuration B inhumations had a more horizontal nature and were at least partially buried among groups of contemporaneous graves. However, there were a couple of graves which complicate this. Grave 12 was of the A configuration, and was interesting because it consisted of two burials: 12A was a male burial with a scabbard mount

in Early Anglo-Saxon cemeteries
Open Access (free)
Jes Wienberg

. Alternatively, selected examples are put forward as arguments or “evidence”. But the arbitrary nature of the choice of examples and interpretations becomes apparent when the recovery of the Mary Rose was used by Wright as an example of a nationalist application of the past and a nostalgic backward glance in a period of decline for the UK. A sidelong glance reveals that the Swedish warship Vasa from the seventeenth century was raised in 1961 (www.vasamuseet.se), while the five Viking ships from Skuldelev in Denmark were raised in 1962 (www.vikingeskibsmuseet.dk) – in both

in Heritopia