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An Interview with James Baldwin (1969)
Rich Blint and Nazar Büyüm

This is the first English language publication of an interview with James Baldwin (1924–87) conducted by Nazar Büyüm in 1969, Istanbul, Turkey. Deemed too long for conventional publication at the time, the interview re-emerged last year and reveals Baldwin’s attitudes about his literary antecedents and influences such as Richard Wright, Langston Hughes, and Countee Cullen; his views concerning the “roles” and “duties” of a writer; his assessment of his critics; his analysis of the power and message of the Nation of Islam; his lament about the corpses that are much of the history and fact of American life; an honest examination of the relationship of poor whites to American blacks; an interrogation of the “sickness” that characterizes Americans’ commitment to the fiction and mythology of “race,” as well as the perils and seductive nature of American power.

James Baldwin Review
James Baldwin’s Radicalism and the Evolution of His Thought on Israel
Nadia Alahmed

This article traces the evolution of James Baldwin’s discourse on the Arab–Israeli conflict as connected to his own evolution as a Black thinker, activist, and author. It creates a nuanced trajectory of the transformation of Baldwin’s thought on the Arab–Israeli conflict and Black and Jewish relations in the U.S. This trajectory is created through the lens of Baldwin’s relationship with some of the major radical Black movements and organizations of the twentieth century: Malcolm X, Elijah Muhammad and the Nation of Islam, and, finally, the Black Power movement, especially the Black Panther Party. Using Baldwin as an example, the article displays the Arab–Israeli conflict as a terrain Black radicals used to articulate their visions of the nature of Black oppression in the U.S., strategies of resistance, the meaning of Black liberation, and articulations of Black identity. It argues that the study of Baldwin’s transformation from a supporter of the Zionist project of nation-building to an advocate of Palestinian rights and national aspirations reveals much about the ideological transformations of the larger Black liberation movement.

James Baldwin Review
Open Access (free)
An ecocritical examination of the birds of Bergman
Linda Haverty Rugg

obtrusive ways: the presence of birds. Looking closely at the representation of birds and their song in Bergman offers insight into the way his films frame the relationship between humans and the non-human environment, but also how they create a space for the human position within nature. Birds in Bergman’s films sometimes seem to be ‘merely’ part of a film’s ambience , a concept that deserves more detailed exploration, since it has special significance both in ecocriticism and in cinema. It might be argued that the

in Ingmar Bergman
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

poker –​‘overcalls’, ‘pre-​emptive bids’, ‘bluffs’ –​seems to capture more accurately the nature of day-​to-​day business. This chapter pursues the argument that both Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps and Savages have rather more to say about money and capitalism as it is practised than much of the commentaries on the films acknowledged in the first instance. Indeed, they speak to the enduring theme of finance that Stone has pursued as much, if not more, than in any of his previous pictures. These films articulate a particular kind of moral collapse that is different

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Living with scandal, rumour, and gossip

This book illuminates the personal experience of being at the centre of a media scandal. The existential level of that experience is highlighted by means of the application of ethnological and phenomenological perspectives to extensive empirical material drawn from a Swedish context. The questions raised and answered in this book include the following: How does the experience of being the protagonist in a media scandal affect a person’s everyday life? What happens to routines, trust, and self-confidence? How does it change the basic settings of his or her lifeworld?

The analysis also contributes new perspectives on the fusion between interpersonal communication that takes place face to face, such as gossip and rumours, and traditional news media in the course of a scandal. A scandal derives its momentum from the audiences, whose engagement in the moral story determines its dissemination and duration. The nature of that engagement also affects the protagonist in specific ways. Members of the public participate through traditional oral communication, one vital aspect of which is activity in digital, social forums.

The author argues that gossip and rumour must be included in the idea of the media system if we are to be able to understand the formation and power of a media scandal, a contention which entails critiques of earlier research. Oral interpersonal communication does not disappear when new communication possibilities arise. Indeed, it may be invigorated by them. The term news legend is introduced, to capture the entanglement between traditional news-media storytelling and oral narrative.

Outdoor screens and public congregations
Ruth Adams

heightened cultural togetherness.’ 3 Does the content determine the nature of these phenomena? Are public broadcasts of royal celebrations qualitatively different from, for example, sporting, theatrical or political events transmitted in a similar fashion? This chapter seeks to answer some of these questions in relation to live public screenings of royal ceremonial and celebration. The novelty and

in The British monarchy on screen
Musical meaning and musical discourse in Ingmar Bergman’s films
Per F. Broman

, Bergman points to its complexities. But despite the fundamental differences in the statements across his oeuvre, they all point towards the essential metaphysical nature of music for Bergman: it may be Beethoven’s Ninth overcoming death, or music as an existential motif in Saraband through metaphoric uses of works and modes of performance; but in the poignant words of a character who is one of Bergman’s greatest human failures, Henrik in Saraband : ‘We walk through our entire life and wonder about death and what

in Ingmar Bergman
Open Access (free)
Paul Henley

that have been produced since the millenium. It is rather a selection of films that seem to me to have had a significant impact or which provide potentially interesting models for the future direction of the genre – given the particular ideas advanced in this book about the nature of contemporary ethnographic practice and the way in which it may be realised through film. These three chapters correspond, more or less, to the three modes of authorial praxis that I consider in Chapters 8 – 10 , albeit in reverse order. In Chapter 14 , I examine how

in Beyond observation
Open Access (free)
Paul Henley

of practical matters of cinematography, sound recording and editing, as well as regarding more abstract issues of an epistemological or aesthetic nature, their ultimate intentions and, importantly, their ethical posture regarding the subjects. Notes 1 Geertz ( 1988 ), 17–19. 2

in Beyond observation
Open Access (free)
Film festivals and the revival of Classic Hollywood
Julian Stringer

out of danger. The displaced meaning strategy allows a culture to remove its ideals from harm’s way. 4 It is the institutional nature of the film festival which creates the conditions necessary for the existence of this particular cultural arrangement. As with the process of labelling that happens at museums and art galleries, any movie shown at a film

in Memory and popular film