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  • Manchester Film and Media Studies x
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Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

poker –​‘overcalls’, ‘pre-​emptive bids’, ‘bluffs’ –​seems to capture more accurately the nature of day-​to-​day business. This chapter pursues the argument that both Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps and Savages have rather more to say about money and capitalism as it is practised than much of the commentaries on the films acknowledged in the first instance. Indeed, they speak to the enduring theme of finance that Stone has pursued as much, if not more, than in any of his previous pictures. These films articulate a particular kind of moral collapse that is different

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

credit for. More importantly, his response to Darrell convinces the audience of the nature of Bobby’s arrogance: it is both personal and metropolitan in its failure of perspective. Bobby’s pursuit of Grace reflects a similar high-​handed attitude, seeing her as no more than a sexual diversion that he can indulge in without consequence. However, Grace highlights his arrogance during their initial encounter at her home. When Grace rebuffs Bobby’s overtures, he accuses her of playing games, to which she replies: ‘And what game you want to play? You carry my boxes for me

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

), to the more lauded and/​or cultish work for Midnight Express (Alan Parker, 1978, for which he won the Academy Award for Best Adapted Screenplay), Scarface (Brian De Palma, 1983) and Year of the Dragon (Michael Cimino, 1985), Stone’s early career CV gathered together solid and praiseworthy credentials that lined him up as a filmmaker with something important (and occasionally outlandish) to say. The somewhat over-​the-​top nature of several of the features above certainly could have their extravagance and In t r od u ctio n virtuosity laid at the door of their

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

famous right-​winger, Bob Dornan –​ and when that happened, the Right came down on Kovic and the movie. So we got quite a bit of controversy, and that certainly hurt us. I think we were the early favourite in January to win the Oscar, but Driving Miss Daisy did better box office and overtook us. We did very well: it was one of the most profitable I’ve ever made. It was not as successful financially as Platoon, because of the issues of the severe wound and the nature of Kovic’s criticism of the United States when he returned. People did not immediately enjoy it, but did

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

-​twentieth century wars and infusing the central tenets of Oliver Stone’s life. Unsurprisingly, his ‘Vietnam trilogy’ has received some of the most intensive scrutiny among all his films, Wa r and the pictures certainly do parade Stone’s preoccupations with political judgement, Cold War consensus and, of course, the nature of conflict, as much as they do his cinematic pretensions. Yet few studies have really addressed these planks of his cinematic oeuvre, much less Stone’s engagement and viewpoint with the wider military and cultural consequences of the ‘American Century’, let

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

matter –​as with many of his considerations of America’s past –​was never just about cinema as history, nor the responsibilities of the filmmaker to history. JFK was about the true nature of political and historical enquiry, about the best ways of communicating alternative or counter-​mythic tales of the recent past and/​or the lost and impenetrable state of society. Stone’s champions in this regard –​critics and colleagues such as Classification and Rating Administration (CARA) head Richard Heffner –​always have known that what he wanted to do was not test the resolve

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Joshua Foa Dienstag in dialogue
Series: Critical Powers

This book engages in a critical encounter with the work of Stanley Cavell on cinema, focusing skeptical attention on the claims made for the contribution of cinema to the ethical character of democratic life. In much of Cavell's writing on film he seeks to show us that the protagonists of the films he terms "remarriage comedies" live a form of perfectionism that he upholds as desirable for contemporary democratic society: moral perfectionism. Films are often viewed on television, and television shows can have "filmlike" qualities. The book addresses the nature of viewing cinematic film as a mode of experience, arguing against Cavell that it is akin to dreaming rather than lived consciousness and, crucially, cannot be shared. It mirrors the celebrated dialogue between Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Jean D'Alembert on theatre. The book articulates the implications of philosophical pessimism for addressing contemporary culture in its relationship to political life. It clarifies how The Americans resembles the remarriage films and can illuminate the issues they raise. The tragedy of remarriage, would be a better instructor of a democratic community, if such a community were prepared to listen. The book suggests that dreaming, both with and without films, is not merely a pleasurable distraction but a valuable pastime for democratic citizens. Finally, it concludes with a robust response from Dienstag to his critics.

Outdoor screens and public congregations
Ruth Adams

heightened cultural togetherness.’ 3 Does the content determine the nature of these phenomena? Are public broadcasts of royal celebrations qualitatively different from, for example, sporting, theatrical or political events transmitted in a similar fashion? This chapter seeks to answer some of these questions in relation to live public screenings of royal ceremonial and celebration. The novelty and

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
Film festivals and the revival of Classic Hollywood
Julian Stringer

out of danger. The displaced meaning strategy allows a culture to remove its ideals from harm’s way. 4 It is the institutional nature of the film festival which creates the conditions necessary for the existence of this particular cultural arrangement. As with the process of labelling that happens at museums and art galleries, any movie shown at a film

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
The ethics and politics of memory in an age of mass culture
Alison Landsberg

Memory is not commonly imagined as a site of possibility for progressive politics. More often, memory, particularly in the form of nostalgia, is condemned for its solipsistic nature, for its tendency to draw people into the past instead of the present. This is the case, for example, in Kathryn Bigelow’s 1995 film Strange Days , in which the use of memory – usually another

in Memory and popular film