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Coreen Anne McGuire

normal lung function for miners, my second group, highlights the extent to which abnormal lung function was attributed to the essential nature of the miner’s body, and underlines the impact of politics on the classification of respiratory disability. As the definitive essay ‘Throwing Like a Girl’ by I. M. Young, which has inspired one of the section headings for this chapter, argued, there are ‘certain observable and rather ordinary ways in which women in our society typically comport themselves and move differently from the ways that men do’. 7 That such ways of

in Measuring difference, numbering normal
Open Access (free)
Coreen Anne McGuire

this book. The medical measurements designed to quantify and define hearing loss and breathlessness are often incongruent with extremely diverse and individual conditions and experiences. Indeed, this project is of significance precisely because of the amorphous nature of the phenomena under consideration; that is, the fact that breathing and hearing are singularly difficult to measure and standardise. There are other pertinent commonalities between hearing and breathing. Air is the medium through which we hear. As both noise and air pollution move through space

in Measuring difference, numbering normal
Open Access (free)
Coreen Anne McGuire

was some acknowledgement of the individual, personal and intangible nature of breathlessness and hearing loss, the processes of testing for confirmation of pathology prioritised instrumental evidence over user voices. This, I argue, is an example of mechanical epistemic injustice. Epistemic injustice connotes the scepticism that greets certain (discriminated) groups’ claims to knowledge. 2 In healthcare, this can affect individuals’ access to treatment as testimonies about their own bodies and health are placed under extra and unnecessary scrutiny. 3 Such extra

in Measuring difference, numbering normal
Coreen Anne McGuire

of electric therapy. In both cases, there was initial optimism and a sense of harnessing the power of nature to heal, as well as conflict around how to quantify sensorial knowledge. 25 Historian Vanessa Heggie has argued that there have been long historical tensions around bodily knowledge versus laboratory knowledge in the design of artificial respiration. For example, she has shown that by the middle of the twentieth century, physiological ‘facts’ related to technologies of artificial respiration used in mountaineering could not be created in laboratories and

in Measuring difference, numbering normal
Coreen Anne McGuire

A rabbit vibrating in F On the evening of Monday, 6 September 1886, Professor William Rutherford travelled from Edinburgh to Birmingham to deliver a lecture to the British Medical Association on a subject that he described as being on ‘the borderland between the realm of physics and that of consciousness’. 1 He began by inviting his audience to consider the nature of sound while they listened to a vibrating pendulum and a number of differently pitched tuning forks. After this, he started on his main topic, ‘The Telephone Theory of the Sense of Hearing

in Measuring difference, numbering normal
Coreen Anne McGuire

in 1934, when he noted that strange as it may appear, there is no body of persons qualified to interpret an aurist’s prescription for a deaf patient, and to supply the appropriate deaf aid instrument, as there are opticians able to read an oculist’s prescription and to provide the spectacles specified. Just as it requires a specialist – the oculist – to ascertain the precise nature and amount of departure from normality in vision, so it requires a skilled person to ascertain the precise kind and degree of deafness from which a deaf patient may be suffering

in Measuring difference, numbering normal
Open Access (free)
Christine E. Hallett

coincidence of nature without and nature within which I  long to remember.’30 Thirty-six years later, the Baroness de T’Serclaes sat down to write her own memoir:  ‘the past comes flooding in’, she asserted; ‘half-forgotten memories  – like the medals in their glass case  – seem to demand attention, a good dust, a new look at their significance’.31 Perhaps the most telling part of her comment is her reference to the ‘medals in their glass case’. In writing her memoir, she appears to be engaged in a dual process:  of both recreating the past and constructing a narrative

in Nurse Writers of the Great War
Christine E. Hallett

and army her background was. In this sense she was the perfect military nurse. Her character, whilst far from simple, was astonishingly pure and unsullied for someone who had clearly encountered some of the worst horrors of the First World War. Kate Luard worked as ‘Lady Matron’ of Bradfield College for several years before being forced to retire by a back problem, the nature of which is unknown, though it is difficult to avoid speculation on its possible origins in her onerous and heavy nursing work. In old age, she lived with two sisters in Wickham Bishops, Essex

in Nurse Writers of the Great War
Open Access (free)
Nursing work and nurses’ space in the Second World War: a gendered construction
Jane Brooks

) nurses were posted into these war zones alongside their medical colleagues to provide increasingly complex treatments for combatants.6 Questions regarding the limits and boundaries of nursing practice meant that the nature of nurses’ work has always been contested. Yet on active service overseas the exigencies of war created crisis environments in which these boundaries could be dissolved, enabling more collaborative, less hierarchical work patterns.7 In Sisters: Extraordinary True-Life Stories from Nurses in World War Two, Barbara Mortimer has an image of a nurse and

in Negotiating nursing
Emergency nursing in the Indian Mutiny
Sam Goodman

at Meerut in May 1857 took the British civil and military administration in India almost entirely by surprise, and, as the disorder spread, scant resources left cities and garrisons not only woefully under-defended but also unprepared for the protracted nature of the violence that followed. However, against the odds, British fortunes prevailed and over the course of the following year, the East India Company army, reinforced by British troops, gradually reconsolidated their control over central India.2 The events that transpired at Delhi, Meerut, Lucknow and most

in Colonial caring