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Steve Sohmer

boon to those hearing the play for the first time. When Viola asks ‘Who governs here?’ her Captain replies:     A noble duke, in nature as in name. Vio.     What is the name? Cap.     Orsino. Vio.     Orsino! I have heard my father name him

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Steve Sohmer

dead. There is wariness and scepticism in their words: Seb.     Do I stand there? I never had a brother; Nor can there be that deity in my nature, Of here and every where. I had a sister, Whom the blind waves and surges have devour’d. Of charity, what kin are you to

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Steve Sohmer

, and mentor. Notes 1 John Haffenden, William Empson , 2 vols (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005 ), I.242–7. Given that the offences alleged were of a sexual nature, and therefore a violation of University regulations, Empson ‘could no longer reside within the town

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
The unknowable image in The Winter’s Tale
Chloe Porter

and sexual difference. 30 The relevance of cultural meanings of motherhood for The Winter’s Tale has already been recognised in a number of studies focusing on Hermione’s maternal body. 31 Significantly, these readings of the play are at times invested in the unknowable, deferred ‘wholeness’ invoked by Hermione’s statue. For example, acknowledging the ‘decidedly patriarchal’ nature

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Chloe Porter

’ and ‘Musicke’. 15 John Bate’s The Mysteryes of Nature, and Art (1634), meanwhile, is divided into four sections; the third covers ‘Drawing, Limning, Colouring, Painting, and Graving’, while the other sections are devoted to waterworks, fireworks and ‘divers experiments’ termed ‘Extravagants’. 16 The title page to Bate’s work shows a man painting in

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Divine destruction in Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay
Chloe Porter

unstable monarchic iconography with iconoclasm directed against aspects of post-Reformation culture implicated in Elizabethan government. The ‘idol’ presented by Bacon’s climactic prophecy is too vulnerable to contain the iconoclasm of which it is the end product. Furthermore, the uncontainable nature of iconoclasm in Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay is in fact suggested by the dynamics of

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Open Access (free)
Invisibility and erasure in The Two Merry Milkmaids
Chloe Porter

on charges of treason. This mix of amused scepticism and investment in the efficacy and possibility of invisibility perhaps gives some insight into the nature of early modern audiences’ engagement with this popular theme. Without entering into complex speculation regarding spectators’ ‘belief’ in invisibility, we might tentatively suggest that since Shakespeare wrote mockingly of invisibility but

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Open Access (free)
Rachel E. Hile

that it “giveth us to feel how many headaches a passionate life bringeth us to” (Sidney, Defence, 128). Like Sidney, Puttenham emphasizes what George A. Test would refer to as the “laughter” trait in satire by linking it explicitly to dramatic comedies. In Puttenham’s version of the history of generic forms, he claims that satire’s “most bitter invective against vice and vicious men” gave way over time to dramatic comedy of two types: the first kind—the so-called Old Comedy of the Greeks— “was somewhat sharp and bitter after the nature of the satire, openly and by

in Spenserian satire
Open Access (free)
Imitation of Spenserian satire
Rachel E. Hile

speaker argues in the “Introduction” for the ease with which we can know the natures of various animals: The Elephant much loue to Man will show. The Tygers, Wolues, and Lyons, we doe finde, Are rauenous, fierce, and cruell euen by kinde. We know at carryon we shall finde the Crowes, And that the Cock the time of midnight knowes. (Wither, Abuses, 43) He then contrasts the difficulty of understanding the nature of the “Creature called Man,” who, because of human inconsistency and mutability, is not “semper idem in his will, / Nor stands on this or that opinion still

in Spenserian satire
The ends of incompletion
Chloe Porter

corresponding absence. The expanding discourse of completeness in this period suggests a growing interest in what it means to enter into a process of production with an anticipated endpoint. The growing nature of that interest, and earlier definitions’ emphasis on piecemeal assemblage, indicate that we cannot take for granted the place of material finish in the early modern imagination

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama