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  • Manchester Studies in Imperialism x
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The intellectual influence of non-medical research on policy and practice in the Colonial Medical Service in Tanganyika and Uganda
Shane Doyle

. Some conditions, defined as social diseases, demanded particular attention, because their incidence was recognised as being shaped by the imperfectly understood nature of local societies. This chapter will examine the nature of colonial knowledge, and the formulation of medical interventions, by focusing on colonial reactions to two social diseases in two neighbouring societies: sexually transmitted

in Beyond the state
John Marriott

privileged role to play: Subserving the important purpose of exploring the darkest recesses of nature, [science] should also light up the darkest retreats of Humanity…. [I]f we really desire success to the one or to the other, to Science or to Missionary enterprise – we must first improve Geography. 7

in The other empire
Open Access (free)
Julie Evans, Patricia Grimshaw, David Philips, and Shurlee Swain

In 1841, Herman Merivale, professor of political economy at Oxford University and soon to be appointed under-secretary of state for the colonies, made the following remarks about the nature of colonisation: The history of the European settlements in America, Africa, and Australia, presents everywhere the same general features – a

in Equal subjects, unequal rights
Open Access (free)
Medical missionaries and government service in Uganda, 1897–1940
Yolana Pringle

1920s to formalise their relationship with individual mission doctors. This is followed by a section that investigates how increased government funding for individual projects, campaigns, and hospitals eventually shifted the nature of colonial medicine in Uganda, and with it the relationship between missionaries and the colonial government. The chapter ends by briefly considering the patients

in Beyond the state
Open Access (free)
Visions of history, visions of Britain
Stephen Howe

on the nature of ‘imperial Britishness’, James’s relevant writings are extremely scattered and mostly brief. This must have been because British society and culture were not strange to him as America’s were: ‘Britishness’ was for James a largely pre-given cultural milieu more often than it was the object of active investigation. Yet James in the USA was intensely engaged in analysing that

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Sabine Clarke

wider reform of colonial policy was under way that aimed to address the limitations of the 1929 Colonial Development Act. The priority of the 1929 Act had been to alleviate unemployment at home by generating demand for British manufactured goods, and the restricted nature of loans from the Act had led to few improvements in social or economic conditions in the colonies. The deprivations experienced by many territories during the Great Depression, along with increasing hostility to British imperialism in the US and Germany, contributed to an acute sense of crisis

in Science at the end of empire
Open Access (free)
John Marriott

of the poor within the imperial formation, and provides a more satisfactory explanation of their chronology and nature than those focusing exclusively on domestic politics and social policy. In the following I wish to explore the workings of this symbolic process. To understand the active construction of racial identities in this period, we need to go beyond the convention of identifying

in The other empire
John Marriott

; the idea could be, and was, articulated in many forms. Taken in general (and retrospective) terms to mean ‘the belief in the movement over time of some aspect or aspects of human existence, within a social setting, toward a better condition’, its precise expression was determined by the particular assumptions made about historical change, human existence and improvement, and the nature of their

in The other empire
Open Access (free)
Science and industrial development: lessons from Britain’s imperial past
Sabine Clarke

diversification was that promoted by Britain. Officials in London favoured limited incentives from colonial governments for business and, in general, wished for minimal disturbance to market forces. Britain would not assume large financial risk in the process of establishing new business across the British Caribbean and it advised colonial governments to act similarly. In addition, officials did not believe that it was the job of planners appointed to an official body to determine the nature of new industry. The role of metropolitan government was to provide the money needed

in Science at the end of empire
Open Access (free)
John Marriott

promote social and religious reform and hence consolidate British authority. Minimally, it suggested that fears of insurgency provoked by undue interference in Indian culture were temporarily suspended. The most significant consequence of the debates, however, was the emergence of a certain consensus on the nature of imperial rule, linked to particular conceptions of the colonized and to

in The other empire