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The unknowable image in The Winter’s Tale
Chloe Porter

and sexual difference. 30 The relevance of cultural meanings of motherhood for The Winter’s Tale has already been recognised in a number of studies focusing on Hermione’s maternal body. 31 Significantly, these readings of the play are at times invested in the unknowable, deferred ‘wholeness’ invoked by Hermione’s statue. For example, acknowledging the ‘decidedly patriarchal’ nature

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Chloe Porter

’ and ‘Musicke’. 15 John Bate’s The Mysteryes of Nature, and Art (1634), meanwhile, is divided into four sections; the third covers ‘Drawing, Limning, Colouring, Painting, and Graving’, while the other sections are devoted to waterworks, fireworks and ‘divers experiments’ termed ‘Extravagants’. 16 The title page to Bate’s work shows a man painting in

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Divine destruction in Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay
Chloe Porter

unstable monarchic iconography with iconoclasm directed against aspects of post-Reformation culture implicated in Elizabethan government. The ‘idol’ presented by Bacon’s climactic prophecy is too vulnerable to contain the iconoclasm of which it is the end product. Furthermore, the uncontainable nature of iconoclasm in Friar Bacon and Friar Bungay is in fact suggested by the dynamics of

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Open Access (free)
Invisibility and erasure in The Two Merry Milkmaids
Chloe Porter

on charges of treason. This mix of amused scepticism and investment in the efficacy and possibility of invisibility perhaps gives some insight into the nature of early modern audiences’ engagement with this popular theme. Without entering into complex speculation regarding spectators’ ‘belief’ in invisibility, we might tentatively suggest that since Shakespeare wrote mockingly of invisibility but

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
The ends of incompletion
Chloe Porter

corresponding absence. The expanding discourse of completeness in this period suggests a growing interest in what it means to enter into a process of production with an anticipated endpoint. The growing nature of that interest, and earlier definitions’ emphasis on piecemeal assemblage, indicate that we cannot take for granted the place of material finish in the early modern imagination

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Open Access (free)
Behind the screen
Chloe Porter

spectators, meanwhile, revel in visual ‘varietie’. 2 Moreover, as Harris suggests, early modern matter is ‘untimely’, palimsestic and reworkable. 3 This critical emphasis on the fractured nature of early modern culture chimes with and is informed by the legacy of postmodernist ‘decentring’, through which critical activity became a mode of unmaking, ‘reading against the

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Steve Sohmer

dead. There is wariness and scepticism in their words: Seb.     Do I stand there? I never had a brother; Nor can there be that deity in my nature, Of here and every where. I had a sister, Whom the blind waves and surges have devour’d. Of charity, what kin are you to

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Steve Sohmer

boon to those hearing the play for the first time. When Viola asks ‘Who governs here?’ her Captain replies:     A noble duke, in nature as in name. Vio.     What is the name? Cap.     Orsino. Vio.     Orsino! I have heard my father name him

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind
Open Access (free)
Speaking pictures?
Chloe Porter

contemporaries as ‘literary’ dramatists who wrote for readers as much as for performance is available; in this study, however, I am concerned with plays as performed, material works that were enjoyed by audiences. 37 The collaborative nature of performance positions rhetorical influences against a host of material, visual and textual contexts informing the construction of the drama as it is played. It would be

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Steve Sohmer

, and mentor. Notes 1 John Haffenden, William Empson , 2 vols (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2005 ), I.242–7. Given that the offences alleged were of a sexual nature, and therefore a violation of University regulations, Empson ‘could no longer reside within the town

in Reading Shakespeare’s mind