Search results

James Baldwin in Conversation with Fritz J. Raddatz (1978)
Gianna Zocco

This is the first English-language publication of an interview with James Baldwin conducted by the German writer, editor, and journalist Fritz J. Raddatz in 1978 at Baldwin’s house in St. Paul-de-Vence. In the same year, it was published in German in the weekly newspaper Die Zeit, as well as in a book of Raddatz’s conversations with international writers, and—in Italian translation—in the newspaper La Repubblica. The interview covers various topics characteristic of Baldwin’s interests at the time—among them his thoughts about Jimmy Carter’s presidency, his reasons for planning to return to the United States, his disillusionment after the series of murders of black civil rights activists in the 1960s and 1970s, and the role of love and sexuality in his literary writings. A special emphasis lies on the discussion of possible parallels between Nazi Germany and U.S. racism, with Baldwin most prominently likening the whole city of New York to a concentration camp. Due to copyright reasons, this reprint is based on an English translation of the edited version published in German. A one-hour tape recording of the original English conversation between Raddatz and Baldwin is accessible at the German literary archive in Marbach.

James Baldwin Review
James Baldwin and Fritz Raddatz
Gianna Zocco

When James Baldwin in No Name in the Street discusses the case of Tony Maynard, who had been imprisoned in Hamburg in 1967, he emphasizes that his efforts to aid his unjustly imprisoned friend were greatly supported by his German publishing house Rowohlt and, in particular, by his then-editor Fritz Raddatz (1931–2015). While the passages on Maynard remain the only instance in Baldwin’s published writings in which Raddatz—praised as a courageous “anti-Nazi German” and a kindred ally who “knows what it means to be beaten in prison”—is mentioned directly, the relation between Baldwin and Raddatz has left traces that cover over fifty years. The African-American writer and Rowohlt’s chief editor got to know each other around 1963, when Baldwin was first published in Germany. They exchanged letters between 1965 and 1984, and many of Raddatz’s critical writings from different periods—the first piece from 1965, the last from 2014—focus of Baldwin’s books. They also collaborated on various projects—among them a long interview and Baldwin’s review of Roots—which were all published in the German weekly newspaper Die Zeit, where Raddatz served as head of the literary and arts sections from 1977 to 1985. Drawing on published and unpublished writings of both men, this article provides a discussion of the most significant facets of this under-explored relationship and its literary achievements. Thereby, it sheds new light on two central questions of recent Baldwin scholarship: first, the circumstances of production and formation crucial to Baldwin’s writings of the 1970s and 1980s, and secondly, Baldwin’s international activities, his transcultural reception and influence.

James Baldwin Review
Open Access (free)
Memories of cinema-going in the ‘Golden Age’ of Hollywood
Sarah Stubbings

this book. While personality and personal history affect the content, intensity and emotional tone of a memory, the social and cultural context of memory also exerts a substantial influence on its form and experience. This chapter explores formations of memory in a contemporary British context, specifically as it relates to memories of cinema-going that have been reproduced in local newspapers. Based on

in Memory and popular film
Mia-Marie Hammarlin

hand, Silberstein felt that there is indeed such a thing as media hounding. She herself used the concept repeatedly during the interview in order to characterise what she described above as the occasion when all journalists move in the same direction. In the line of reasoning of political editor-in-chief of the daily newspaper Sydsvenska Dagbladet, Heidi Avellan, an ambivalence also manifested itself in connection with the concept: But that it appears to be a hounding, everything appears to be a hounding today. It’s no longer the case that there are Rapport, Ekot

in Exposed
Mia-Marie Hammarlin

observes (Darnton 2004). Paris at this time was abuzz with sound, life, talk, and a continually ongoing exchange of information. Songs were sung and poems recited, gossip passed from one person to another, rumours were spread, and the few newspapers in existence were read aloud (Darnton 1997, 2000, 2005, 2010). News distribution was a natural part of the many occupations of everyday life.4 In order to find out what was happening, people would go to so-called nouvellistes de bouche, whose task it was to spread oral news. Darnton translates this French expression into

in Exposed
Open Access (free)
Mia-Marie Hammarlin

this, what does one do?5 This blog post was mentioned in the web edition of the local newspaper which chose to follow up the story and do two interviews, one with the coach Anders and one with the tournament manager, who supported the coach’s story. They both felt that what had happened was unforgivable. Things like this must not happen. You do not abandon your child in another town, having taken him to task and told him to find his way home in the winter cold wearing nothing but his match clothes. That is child abuse. ‘I feel sorry for the kid who has to come home

in Exposed
Isabel Quigly

offended almost to tears and then to weeks of coldness and complaint by a scene in Kevin Brownlow’s It Happened Here (1963) , in which a National Front member – a ‘real’ person, not an actor – spewed out his own passionately anti-Semitic opinions; newspapers shutting down without warning, as the News Chronicle did, leaving its well-liked film man Paul Dehn high and dry (though not for long), to our

in British cinema of the 1950s
Mia-Marie Hammarlin

safe. When the reporting was at its most intense, her partner slept with a baseball bat at the side of the bed. Maja Lundgren, for her part, did not have direct death threats levelled against her; but in the newspapers people speculated that she might be so mentally unstable that she could be considered a danger to her own life. She personally experienced the media scrutiny as threatening in itself. ML: It’s a feeling that one is about to be killed, sort of. I: A feeling that one is about to be killed? ML: Yes, one grows sort of weak at the knees and such things

in Exposed
A lost epic of the reign of Victoria
Jude Cowan Montague

project. Despite describing himself as a patriotic republican he expressed respect for the British monarch as the head of his nation state. 3 Research for the film drew on illustrated newspapers of Victoria’s reign. Julian Wylie, Samuelson’s older brother, described how he, Samuelson and Barker had visited the second-hand bookshops on Charing Cross Road, where ‘we got volumes of the illustrated papers of

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
Mia-Marie Hammarlin

, known as a loyal, proud, and correct woman. Now they stare at her and no longer want to ride in the lift with her. They avoid or attack her. Friends desert her. Acquaintances make statements about her being a shady character. Anonymous men call her at night and breathe heavily into the receiver. The newspaper’s obsession with the crime Blum has supposedly committed – before the murder, that is; throughout the novel, she is accused of harbouring a fugitive from justice – gives rise to inventive interpretations of the statements made by the people around her. When Blum

in Exposed