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Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

to some degree. I think there was some issues with The Doors because of sexuality, but I can’t remember –​we may have cleaned it up. In Heaven and Earth there was a vivid rape scene and CARA made suggestions. We went to see CARA, and tried to maintain a friendly relationship. Heffner was very good at this. CARA would seek to help by making ‘under the table’ suggestions so as to avoid giving an official rating R, or whatever, which would then get in the newspapers and become an issue. I remember doing this several times, where the issues would be dealt with quietly

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

that genre’s tradition and trends over recent years, including the increasing presence of feature film aesthetics and entertainment values. By the time JFK hit US cinemas in late 1991, Stone’s political filmmaking was the subject of op-​ed pages in major national newspapers, not simply the province of independently-​minded film critics. The initial reception to the counter-​mythic rendering of Kennedy’s death constructed two opposing ranks almost immediately. In one corner stood the media –​primarily print journalists, but supported by a few television commentators

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

storytelling ends might be seen to have 121 Th e ci nem a of Ol iver   S to ne 122 borne fruit, with such tales straight out of the newspaper front page headlines. Just as the original Wall Street, and just like its literary companion of the time, Tom Wolfe’s caustic novel, The Bonfire of the Vanities (1987),5 had parodied the hubris and greed of the Reagan era, so Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps and Savages appeared to be lambasting the vacuity and hollow moral leanings of the contemporary age. Yet both films ended up receiving criticism for failing to deliver an even

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
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Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

in –​a post-​war America that conspired against communism abroad, and ran scared of its shadow at home –​was forged in the call to war that newspaper editor Henry Luce entreated Americans to embrace in his 1941 article, ‘The American Century’: Th e ci nem a of Ol iver   S to ne In the field of national policy, the fundamental trouble with America has been, and is, that whereas their nation became in the 20th century the most powerful and the most vital nation in the world, nevertheless Americans were unable to accommodate themselves spiritually and practically to

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
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Memories of cinema-going in the ‘Golden Age’ of Hollywood
Sarah Stubbings

this book. While personality and personal history affect the content, intensity and emotional tone of a memory, the social and cultural context of memory also exerts a substantial influence on its form and experience. This chapter explores formations of memory in a contemporary British context, specifically as it relates to memories of cinema-going that have been reproduced in local newspapers. Based on

in Memory and popular film
Isabel Quigly

offended almost to tears and then to weeks of coldness and complaint by a scene in Kevin Brownlow’s It Happened Here (1963) , in which a National Front member – a ‘real’ person, not an actor – spewed out his own passionately anti-Semitic opinions; newspapers shutting down without warning, as the News Chronicle did, leaving its well-liked film man Paul Dehn high and dry (though not for long), to our

in British cinema of the 1950s
A lost epic of the reign of Victoria
Jude Cowan Montague

project. Despite describing himself as a patriotic republican he expressed respect for the British monarch as the head of his nation state. 3 Research for the film drew on illustrated newspapers of Victoria’s reign. Julian Wylie, Samuelson’s older brother, described how he, Samuelson and Barker had visited the second-hand bookshops on Charing Cross Road, where ‘we got volumes of the illustrated papers of

in The British monarchy on screen
The Pony Express at the Diamond Jubilee
Heidi Kenaga

Express was ‘ignored by the public’, achieving neither the huge box office returns nor the long-term impact of The Covered Wagon . Yet the film was considered one of 1925’s top moneymakers, and it also made the ‘Ten Best’ list in many trade journals as well as periodicals and newspapers. 4 Other historians have simply substantiated producers’ own claims that such movies were the first to present the

in Memory and popular film
Open Access (free)
The Queen in Australia
Jane Landman

to the world of the unity of the peoples of the Commonwealth of nations’. 41 Subsequent hopes for the international influence of a film distilling such a potent expression of Commonwealth loyalty were similarly tied up in Cold War rhetoric. While a Glasgow newspaper review’s claims that ‘if The Queen in Australia could be thrown on the inside of the Iron Curtain for a week, future

in The British monarchy on screen
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Serious Charge and film censorship
Tony Aldgate

’s Plays Correspondence Files, Department of Manuscripts, British Library, Serious Charge 1951/5355, play reader’s report (16 March 1953) and other memoranda or correspondence related to same. All references hereafter to the Lord Chamberlain’s Office come from this file. 3 Newspaper reviews for the

in British cinema of the 1950s