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James Baldwin in Conversation with Fritz J. Raddatz (1978)
Gianna Zocco

This is the first English-language publication of an interview with James Baldwin conducted by the German writer, editor, and journalist Fritz J. Raddatz in 1978 at Baldwin’s house in St. Paul-de-Vence. In the same year, it was published in German in the weekly newspaper Die Zeit, as well as in a book of Raddatz’s conversations with international writers, and—in Italian translation—in the newspaper La Repubblica. The interview covers various topics characteristic of Baldwin’s interests at the time—among them his thoughts about Jimmy Carter’s presidency, his reasons for planning to return to the United States, his disillusionment after the series of murders of black civil rights activists in the 1960s and 1970s, and the role of love and sexuality in his literary writings. A special emphasis lies on the discussion of possible parallels between Nazi Germany and U.S. racism, with Baldwin most prominently likening the whole city of New York to a concentration camp. Due to copyright reasons, this reprint is based on an English translation of the edited version published in German. A one-hour tape recording of the original English conversation between Raddatz and Baldwin is accessible at the German literary archive in Marbach.

James Baldwin Review
James Baldwin and Fritz Raddatz
Gianna Zocco

When James Baldwin in No Name in the Street discusses the case of Tony Maynard, who had been imprisoned in Hamburg in 1967, he emphasizes that his efforts to aid his unjustly imprisoned friend were greatly supported by his German publishing house Rowohlt and, in particular, by his then-editor Fritz Raddatz (1931–2015). While the passages on Maynard remain the only instance in Baldwin’s published writings in which Raddatz—praised as a courageous “anti-Nazi German” and a kindred ally who “knows what it means to be beaten in prison”—is mentioned directly, the relation between Baldwin and Raddatz has left traces that cover over fifty years. The African-American writer and Rowohlt’s chief editor got to know each other around 1963, when Baldwin was first published in Germany. They exchanged letters between 1965 and 1984, and many of Raddatz’s critical writings from different periods—the first piece from 1965, the last from 2014—focus of Baldwin’s books. They also collaborated on various projects—among them a long interview and Baldwin’s review of Roots—which were all published in the German weekly newspaper Die Zeit, where Raddatz served as head of the literary and arts sections from 1977 to 1985. Drawing on published and unpublished writings of both men, this article provides a discussion of the most significant facets of this under-explored relationship and its literary achievements. Thereby, it sheds new light on two central questions of recent Baldwin scholarship: first, the circumstances of production and formation crucial to Baldwin’s writings of the 1970s and 1980s, and secondly, Baldwin’s international activities, his transcultural reception and influence.

James Baldwin Review
The representation of violence in Northern Irish art
Shane Alcobia-Murphy

is little wonder that this has become the critical focus of much artwork.29 For example, Rita Donagh, a Staffordshire-born artist, responded to ways in which the Sunday Times reported and photographed the Talbot Street bombing on 19 May 1974. One work from this series, Aftermath, includes a newspaper photograph of people milling about a corpse which has been covered up and shielded from the public gaze. Below this she has drawn an extension of this scene, enlarging (and thus foregrounding) the image of the hidden body. What conceals the person’s identity in her

in Irish literature since 1990
Open Access (free)
Language, lies and the crisis of representation in Such a Long Journey
Peter Morey

newspaper. A few months later, Nagarwala was removed to hospital, allegedly complaining of chest pains, where he died in March 1972.4 So, was Nagarwala a scapegoat, a ‘patsy’, taking the blame for corruption at the highest level? And did the Prime Minister’s private secretary, unaware of the unorthodox financial arrangement, unwittingly expose it by sending the cashier to the police? Just how was it possible for the Prime Minister simply to telephone the State Bank and demand money from it anyway? And what was the money really intended for? (A further twist to the tale

in Rohinton Mistry
Jonathan Atkin

organisation, nor newspapers, nor public opinion, especially in war-time’.12 The Manifesto issued by the NCF in September 1915 distinguished between and drew together the differing categories of objection and united them under the cause of the threat to the sacredness of the human personality. ‘First and foremost’, the pamphlet declared, ‘our decision rests on the ground of the serious violation of moral and religious convictions which a system of compulsion must involve’,13 while another NCF pamphlet, Compulsory Military and Alternative Services and the Conscientious

in A war of individuals
Open Access (free)
Henry David Thoreau
David Herd

– is of a man out of circulation. As his defining gesture has it: ‘I lived alone, in the woods, a mile from any neighbor, in a house which I had built myself, on the shore of Walden Pond’. He received visitors, of course – there is a chapter devoted to them – and he would in turn visit his friends, notably Emerson, notably (sometimes) for dinner. He also records in ‘The Village’ how he would regularly step back ‘to hear some of the gossip which is incessantly going on there, circulating either from mouth to mouth or from newspaper to newspaper’ (W 151). So he wasn

in Enthusiast!
Open Access (free)
Ethnicity and popular music in British cultural studies
Sean Campbell

a man on the way home from a pub was ‘mugged’ on a piece of waste ground, robbed and badly injured. (viii, my emphasis) This man, we later learn (by virtue of a quote from the Daily Mail), was Robert Keenan, ‘an Irish labourer’ (91). Meanwhile, one of the boys who had attacked him, James Duignan, had migrated with his parents from Ireland to England as an infant. This detail is entirely absent in the text, despite the fact that the authors had implicitly described him as ‘ethnic’ in their description of the ‘muggers’, and subsequently quoted from a newspaper

in Across the margins
Translatina world-making in The Salt Mines and Wildness
Laura Horak

status in the United States and change their documentation to fit their gender identity. Tsang clearly worries that increasing media attention on the Silver Platter due to the Wildness parties will put the bar’s regulars at risk. At the same time, Gonzalo, the bar’s co-​owner, notes that when the crowds get unwieldly on Wildness nights, the police never intervene, unlike on regular nights. However, when the Los Angeles Times deems the bar ‘LA’s Best Tranny Bar’, Tsang and friends ask the newspaper not to print the review, because ‘there will be serious consequences for

in The power of vulnerability
Open Access (free)
Representations of Irish political leaders in the ‘Haughey’ plays of Carr, Barry and Breen
Anthony Roche

political life which is virtually unprecedented in the canon. What most surprised me when I saw Hinterland was the extent and degree of the parallels between Barry’s fictional Johnny Silvester and Charles J. Haughey. Much of the hostility the play attracted was charged to the closeness of the parallel, as being ‘too personal’. Both in 2002 were men in their seventies, recent Taoisigh living in ostentatious Georgian mansions in north Dublin. Both have had a strong measure of success in their long, chequered careers but are now facing daily denunciation in the newspapers

in Irish literature since 1990
Open Access (free)
Jonathan Atkin

’ and belonged, therefore, to the realm of war) but rather, he exhibited an ‘intense effective personality’ which could thus in wartime become, ‘a rallying point for all those unseen creative forces which will slowly but surely overcome the destructive forces of war’.21 The practical truth of this lies in the struggles of Bertrand Russell. The journalist H.M. Tomlinson was a war correspondent in France for the Daily News from 1914 to 1917. He was eventually withdrawn by the Newspaper Proprietor’s Association for being too ‘humanitarian’ in his outlook; his experience

in A war of individuals