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Britishness, respectability, and imperial citizenship
Charles V. Reed

, Peregrino moved to the United States around 1890, editing and publishing ‘coloured’ newspapers in Buffalo and Pittsburgh before emigrating to the Cape Colony in 1900. He came to the Cape in the midst of the South African War, he said, to ‘devote his pen and brain to the service of the native people’. 2 As editor of the Cape Town-based South African Spectator , Peregrino articulated a belief in British

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
Open Access (free)
Edward M. Spiers

asserts, had produced a ‘new outpouring of writing’ and ‘an equal appetite for reading’ about it, hence the dispatch of 58 newspaper correspondents with the main British army to South Africa. 4 Yet in The Red Soldier ( 1977 ), and in Marching Over Africa (1986), the late Frank Emery revealed that Victorian soldiers had written numerous letters from earlier

in The Victorian soldier in Africa
Charles V. Reed

rule over native peoples. Shepstone offered an address ‘that had been agreed upon for the sake of brevity by the native chiefs’. 62 The settler newspaper Natal Mercury understood it as proof that ‘these barbarous things’ had been ‘tamed’ under the ‘easy yoke of the British Government’, which offered protection and safety from the cruelty of local chiefs. 63 The fierce dance by one young Zulu

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
Open Access (free)
Global Britishness and settler cultures in South Africa and New Zealand
Charles V. Reed

subjects at home and in the empire, both projects represented the progress and development of an expanding British world. Cape Town newspaper writers and colonial officials celebrated this day as one of the most important in all the history of South Africa. It was a historic day, they would suggest, a day when the Cape Colony began to transform from a backwater of the British Empire to an important depot of commerce

in Royal tourists, colonial subjects and the making of a British world, 1860–1911
Defending Cold War Canada
Katie Pickles

dean as ‘a supporter of the doctrines of Communism emanating from Russia’. 42 An editorial in the St Catharines’s Standard supported the IODE’s call, stating: ‘The IODE doesn’t want him admitted to Canada at all, and that patriotic body of women is quite right. Communism cannot be combated if we entertain and encourage it right at home.’ 43 Other newspaper reports called upon supporters

in Female imperialism and national identity
Open Access (free)
Edward M. Spiers

), when protecting a bridge at Bethulie in the Orange Free State, about 100 miles from the nearest town, complained: ‘We don’t know any news here. Have not seen a paper for three weeks, and then there is no news of the war but what is sent out from London.’ 3 Private R. Munro (2/Black Watch), when based at the desolate garrison of Winburg, yearned for mail and newspapers from home as ‘it is weary waiting

in The Victorian soldier in Africa
Edward M. Spiers

(hence the anxiety about the receipt of post and newspapers from Britain), 20 they endured the heat, thunderstorms, and the ordeal of African campaigning without the excitement of engaging an enemy and the accompanying opportunities to earn medals and promotions in the field. In writing to his wife, Methuen, a veteran of the Asante and Egyptian campaigns, deeply resented his exclusion from the Nile

in The Victorian soldier in Africa
Claude McKay’s experience and analysis of Britain
Winston James

American racism shocked and appalled him. ‘I had heard of prejudice in America but never dreamed of it being so intensely bitter’, he wrote in 1918. 9 He was attracted by Garvey’s Universal Negro Improvement Association, wrote for its newspaper, the Negro World , but never joined the organisation. However, while working in a Manhattan factory, McKay did join the Industrial Workers of the World (IWW), the

in West Indian intellectuals in Britain
Sabine Clarke

-educated English man and would not be intelligible to the average colonial reader; he asked that it might be rewritten in a simpler style.’ 53 One function of the annual report, then, was to promote the value and achievements of scientific research to readers in the colonies themselves. Thaysen and the CPRC worked hard to shape the image of the CMRI through the Trinidadian press. The institute was the subject of numerous articles and reports during the 1940s and 1950s in Trinidad’s daily newspaper, the Trinidad Guardian . In the publicity surrounding the

in Science at the end of empire
Open Access (free)
Empire, migration and the 1928 English Schoolgirl Tour
Katie Pickles

Canadian newspapers in the 1920s had been full of articles discussing the pros and cons of immigration to Canada, yet coverage of this tour in the Canadian mainstream press was limited to a few group photographs of the prim young English schoolgirls, and the details of their itinerary were placed mainly on the social pages. 3 I have found no mention of the tour in the left-wing press of the time: the opportunity

in Female imperialism and national identity