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The hygienic utopia in Jules Verne, Camille Flammarion, and William Morris
Manon Mathias

Ibid ., 147: ‘une précaution indispensable pour se débarrasser d'une population jaune, qui n'aurait pas manqué de modifier d'une manières assez fâcheuse le type et le génie de la cité nouvelle’. 96 L. Otis, Membranes: Metaphors of Invasion in Nineteenth-Century Literature, Science, and Politics (Baltimore, MD/London: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999), 5

in Progress and pathology
Cancer, modernity, and decline in fin-de-siècle Britain
Agnes Arnold-Forster

History, c . 1880–1900 (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2000); M. Saler (ed.), The Fin-de-Siècle World (London: Routledge, 2015). 8 L. Otis, Membranes: Metaphors of Invasion in Nineteenth-Century Literature, Science, and Politics (Baltimore, MD/London: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1999); S. Sontag, Illness as Metaphor and AIDS and its Metaphors (London: Penguin, 2013); M. Stolberg, ‘Metaphors and images of cancer in early

in Progress and pathology
Leopold von Sacher-Masoch’s Venus im Pelz (1870)
Birgit Lang

the time, and a toned-down version was reprinted in 1754. The text is referenced in many key works of nineteenth-­century literature, for example in Stendhal’s Le Rouge et le Noir (1830); in La Dame aux camélias (1848) by Alexandre Dumas and perhaps most famously in Oscar Wilde’s novel The Picture of Dorian Gray (1890). 127 Schlichtegroll, ‘Sacher-Masoch und die Masochisten’, p. 100. 128 Wanda von Sacher-Masoch argued that Sacher-Masoch had written her a letter in which he threatened publish a diary that would ‘destroy’ her if she did not do as he pleased. Wanda

in A history of the case study
David M. Turner and Daniel Blackie

professionals were given a voice through their contributions to government inquiries such as Chadwick’s Sanitary Commission and the Children’s Employment Commission, both of which reported in 1842. The ways in which medical men’s increasingly close involvement in the lives of diseased and disabled miners stimulated the production of medical knowledge is evident above all in the expanding nineteenth-century literature on lung diseases. While the influence of dust in causing respiratory illness had been noted by writers in the sixteenth century, it was during the 1820s and 1830

in Disability in the Industrial Revolution
Open Access (free)
Linda Maynard

Interaction: A Neglected Area of Family Life Research’, Social Forces , 42:3 (1964), pp. 279–288; R. Sanders, Sibling Relationships: Theory and Issues for Practice (Basingstoke, 2004), p. 1. 4 V. Sanders, The Brother–Sister Culture in Nineteenth-Century Literature (London, 2002); J. Watson, Fighting Different Wars. Experience, Memory, and the First World War in Britain (Cambridge, 2004); A. Woollacott, ‘Sisters and Brothers in Arms: Family, Class, and Gendering in World War I Britain’, in M. Cooke and A. Woollacott (eds), Gendering War Talk (Princeton, 1993

in Brothers in the Great War