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Theatre and the politics of engagement
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This book is about science in theatre and performance. It explores how theatre and performance engage with emerging scientific themes from artificial intelligence to genetics and climate change. The book covers a wide range of performance forms from the spectacle of the Paralympics Opening Ceremony to Broadway musicals, from experimental contemporary performance and opera to educational theatre, Somali poetic drama and grime videos. It features work by pioneering companies including Gob Squad, Headlong Theatre and Theatre of Debate as well as offering fresh analysis of global blockbusters such as Wicked and Urinetown. The book offers detailed description and analysis of theatre and performance practices as well as broader commentary on the politics of theatre as public engagement with science. It documents important examples of collaborative practice with extended discussion of the Theatre of Debate process developed by Y Touring theatre company, exploration of bilingual theatre-making in East London and an account of how grime MCs and dermatologists ended up making a film together in Birmingham. The interdisciplinary approach draws on contemporary research in theatre and performance studies in combination with key ideas from science studies. It shows how theatre can offer important perspectives on what the philosopher of science Isabelle Stengers has called ‘cosmopolitics’. The book argues that theatre can flatten knowledge hierarchies and hold together different ways of knowing.

Open Access (free)
Murphy’s misrecognition of love
John Robert Keller

’ (mirroring his internal state almost hallucinogenically), or a return home, for fear of disappointing Celia. He feels the only solution is to eat his lunch, ‘more than an hour before he was due to salivate’ (79), a Pavlovian allusion that reveals the mechanistic nature of his internal world. Lunch Keller_03_ch2pm 59 23/9/02, 10:57 am 60 Samuel Beckett and the primacy of love is a daily ‘ritual vitiated by no base thoughts of nutrition’ (80), functioning as a complex drama through which he enacts internal struggles centered on early disconnection. Feeling undeserving

in Samuel Beckett and the primacy of love
Barbery, earwax and snip-snaps
Eleanor Decamp

‘reasty’, which also is etymologically linked to ‘reasy’ and ‘rusty’. 28 George Peele, The Old Wives Tale (1595), s.d. E1r. 29 See Helkiah Crooke, Mikrokosmographia (1615), p. 576; Walter Charleton, Natural History of Nutrition, Life, and Voluntary Motion (1659), p. 97. 30 Scipion Dupleix, The Resolver (1635), P2v. Cf. Pierre de La Primaudaye, The French Academie (1618) p. 127. 31 See Crooke, pp. 66–70. 32 Will Fisher, ‘Staging the Beard’, in Staged Properties in Early Modern English Drama, ed. Jonathan Gil Harris and Natasha Korda (Cambridge: Cambridge University

in The senses in early modern England, 1558–1660
Richard Serjeantson

the English version of eighteen years before (1605). Bacon also wrote at length elsewhere on matters of health, sickness and nutrition, mostly in his late natural histories: the Sylva Sylvarum, and the History of Life and Death (Historia vitae et mortis, 1623). These medical issues are a vital – but rather neglected – aspect of Bacon’s interest in nature.30 Moreover, his growing preoccupation with medicine emerges strongly in the late New Atlantis. The work as a whole manifests a deep interest in the central questions of Renaissance medicine: how to cure disease

in Francis Bacon’s New Atlantis
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Sustainability, the arts and the watermill
Jayne Elisabeth Archer
,
Howard Thomas
, and
Richard Marggraf Turley

500 tons of water to make 1 ton of potatoes. A ton of wheat needs 900 tons, maize 1,400 tons, and rice comes in at a mighty 2,200 tons (Mekonnen and Hoekstra 2010). The international trade in food can therefore be understood an international trade in water. In the sciences, a proxy is a measurement of one physical quantity that is used as an indicator for the value of another. Food can be considered to be a proxy for both water and for the chemicals required for human nutrition. Former ages were attuned to this fact: for example, owners of watermills who diverted

in Literature and sustainability
Cardboard publishers in Latin America
Lucy Bell

Arivaldo, who insists that ‘there will always be someone working in recycling to get the benefits, to sustain/ support [sustentar] themselves’ (13). Sustainability for the catadores means ‘to be able to carry on providing sustenance’, meeting their own basic needs and those of their children. More than an environmental challenge, it is a matter of human instinct, biology and finances. And, as we have seen, the catadores, like Bauman and Katoppo, view survival as social as well as biological and economic: from the perspective of the poor, the problems of nutrition cannot

in Literature and sustainability
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Ecopoetics, enjoyment and ecstatic hospitality
Kate Rigby

engaged in vital conservation and (increasingly, anticipatory) restoration efforts (Altman and Kerins 2012).4 Mathews also foresees a vital place for those techno-scientific advances (for instance, in nutrition, housing, water use and energy production) that could help to relieve the human pressure on the biosphere as we Deep sustainability 61 transition to a new, ‘ecological civilisation’.5 In addition to constraining human population growth and consumption levels through democraticallyinstituted forms of sustainable development that promote social equity and

in Literature and sustainability
Theatre of Debate
Simon Parry

proceeded from specific concepts, diagnoses or technologies often associated with biomedicine. In the 1990s this included HIV/AIDS, Friedreich ataxia, pre-implantation genetic diagnosis, xenotransplantation, depression and genetic modification. In the 2000s this meant stem cells, organ transplants, behavioural genetics, post-traumatic stress, dementia, animals in health research, climate change, surveillance, clinical trials and electronic patient records. In the 2010s they tackled pharmacogenetics, cancer, neurotechnologies, nutrition and diabetes. While live theatre

in Science in performance
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Watt’s unwelcome home
John Robert Keller

harmony. This fantasy is catastrophically drained, the source of nutrition is depleted or withheld, and total annihilation results (‘everyone is gone’). Watt is unable to maintain an enduring image of a good, loving mother/nutrient-giver; rather, his internal world is dominated by an imago that is withholding, sadistic, or depleted by greedy, sadistic infantile demands, and the final paradoxical line (‘home to oblivion’) reflects a return to futile entrapment. On the primitive edge of Knott Watt’s stay with Mr Knott is an attempt at self-reparation, a tragic search for

in Samuel Beckett and the primacy of love
Open Access (free)
Self-entrapment in Waiting for Godot
John Robert Keller

’t like it. I’ve never known him to refuse a bone before. (He looks anxiously at Lucky.) Nice business if he fell sick on me! (27)17 Lucky’s despair is so deep he cannot accept nutrition, but Pozzo reveals his own anxiety about losing him, since he cannot survive without the slave, whom he requires as a repository for the bad parts of himself. Pozzo is enmeshed as well as ‘enmesher’, like the mother-asinfant in Ms A.’s dream of dancing. He maintains narcissistic equilibrium through a grandiose sense of omnipotence, and an omnivorous, devouring attitude reminiscent of

in Samuel Beckett and the primacy of love