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Open Access (free)
Dana Mills

struggle occurs against the backdrop of the Israeli occupation and consequent human rights abuse. The first subjects inscribing their human rights are dabke dancers, performing Palestine’s national dance. Dabke: political space for a sovereign state in the making In a study of dabke on the West Bank, Mauro Van Aken notes that ritual practices and embodied identities have seldom been studied in Palestinian literature (Aken 2006). Nicholas Rowe, who in his book Rising Dust has conducted the most extensive study of dance in Palestine available to date, commences his

in Dance and politics
Open Access (free)
Sharing anthropology
Paul Henley

as an engineering student at the elite grande école , Ponts et Chausées, and had no formal connection with either anthropology or film-making. But with Paris already under the German occupation, he considered these lectures in the darkened basement of the Musée as one of the few available windows on to the outside world. The relationships that he formed with Griaule and Dieterlen through this extramural course would be of crucial importance in shaping his future career. Shortly afterwards, to fulfil his dream of travelling to West Africa as

in Beyond observation
Paul Henley

eccentricity, with the action cutting repeatedly back and forth between them in a series of very short scenes, in the manner of a fictional soap opera. While arguably even these series could be said to have had certain minimally descriptive ethnographic qualities, the subject matter was typically very trivial, focusing on the most banal activities of the practitioners of particular occupations, such as driving instructors, traffic wardens, vets and holiday tour ‘reps’. Soon, even these modest real-life ethnographic contexts were abandoned as the format

in Beyond observation
Mia-Marie Hammarlin

observes (Darnton 2004). Paris at this time was abuzz with sound, life, talk, and a continually ongoing exchange of information. Songs were sung and poems recited, gossip passed from one person to another, rumours were spread, and the few newspapers in existence were read aloud (Darnton 1997, 2000, 2005, 2010). News distribution was a natural part of the many occupations of everyday life.4 In order to find out what was happening, people would go to so-called nouvellistes de bouche, whose task it was to spread oral news. Darnton translates this French expression into

in Exposed
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

give them the business but without his participation, in a desperate attempt to escape the confines of this dangerous occupation in which he finds them all. Wanting to move into environmental work, he later agrees to collaboration as a ruse to buy time to allow himself, Chon and O to disappear. The cartel’s enforcer Lado suspects the move, and the cartel kidnaps O, using her as leverage to force Ben and Chon to cooperate in a first transaction with the cartel. The full deal requires that Ben and Chon work for three years, and that in return O will be released after

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

about their ideology, tactics or philosophy in the battle to end the ‘occupation’ of their land as they saw it, but also, pragmatically, how much it would cost to buy a tank. The seemingly odd questioning was actually what still remains prevalent in politics for Stone: it is about power, persuasion and accountability, and those things are still acquired by the same age-​old means: influence, connections and money. Notes 1 Interview with Oliver Stone, Santa Monica, CA, 8 December 2011. 2 Richard Heffner, ‘The Open Mind, ‘History as an “Act of Faith”: Dallas, November

in The cinema of Oliver Stone