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Open Access (free)
Linda Maynard

. 50 Alongside the local and occupational spheres of masculine association forming the core of the Pals battalions, we must add familial and fraternal identities. Despite frequent references in men’s personal narratives, this component of Kitchener’s army is largely absent from the historiography. The predominant focus on comradeship mutes fraternal war stories. What makes this more surprising is the long-established army principle that an older serving brother could ‘claim’ a younger sibling to serve alongside him. 51 This could be deployed as a protective measure

in Brothers in the Great War
Open Access (free)
Linda Maynard

, brothers signalled fraternal approval. Joining the numbers of middle-class women eager to establish their commitment to the national defence, Phyllis Puckle undertook VAD training, part of the War Office’s initiative to prepare for war. The Puckle siblings later served at Cynfield Hospital, Shrewsbury: Phyllis as a nurse and her sister Mollie as a cook. 63 Their brother George praised their hard work, recognising Phyllis’s satisfaction at ‘really doing something now’. 64 Personal narratives provide rare incidents of brothers providing practical help in support of their

in Brothers in the Great War
Open Access (free)
Linda Maynard

affection for siblings is a common motif in personal narratives. Brothers in the Great War complements the growing scholarship on fatherhood and romantic love by drawing attention to this neglected aspect of men’s emotional development. Brothers present a different masculine role model to younger brothers than fathers do for their sons. 3 The absence of an explicit verbal language of love to represent affectionate sibling relationships must not be equated with an absence of profound feelings. 4 The engrained family culture of ‘felt’ values instilled by parents and

in Brothers in the Great War
Open Access (free)
Sarah Roddy

women in America write home’ in Éire-Ireland, xxxvi:1 (Summer 2001), 166–84; E. R. R. Green, ‘Ulster emigrants’ letters’ in E. R. R. Green (ed.), Essays in Scotch-Irish History (London, 1969), pp. 87–103; David Fitzpatrick, ‘“That beloved country, that nothing else resembles”: connotations of Irishness in Irish-Australasian letters, 1841–1915’ in I.H.S., xxvii:108 (Nov. 1991), 324–51; Angela McCarthy, Personal Narratives of Irish and Scottish Migration, 1921–65: ‘For Spirit and Adventure’ (Manchester, 2007); Trevor Parkhill, ‘Philadelphia here I come: a study of the

in Population, providence and empire
Open Access (free)
Balance, malleability and anthropology: historical contexts
Chris Millard

the hegemony of science involves the mobilisation of ‘personal narratives’ or ‘patient perspectives’. But these too are the product of history and are structured and constrained by notions of ‘experience’, psychoanalytic ‘catharsis’ and significant freight from 1960s social history. 72 It seems unwise to risk ceding the humanities to the new biology (as friendly collaboration seems ill-placed to challenge the damaging frame of reference where the social sciences are second-class add-ons), or unthinkingly picking up

in Balancing the self
Open Access (free)
Linda Maynard

depth of brotherly bonds but also to their significance as loving relationships. Given the relative youth of serving men in the Great War, established ties to siblings held greater emotional salience. Close relationships among adult siblings can be traced back to their childhood experiences. 2 Patterns established in childhood and adolescence extended into wartime behaviours. 3 Brotherly relationships appear to have been significant, providing emotional and practical sustenance. By examining the personal narratives of men who had a close, affectionate bond with at

in Brothers in the Great War
Open Access (free)
Linda Maynard

maintenance of others. 16 A separate investigation by Seebohm Rowntree and Frank Stuart in 1919 reported a far lower figure of 12.06 per cent by discounting working women’s contributions if the male breadwinner’s earnings were above the poverty line. 17 Personal narratives proffer an insight into sisters’ attitudes to war work and how they balanced the conflicting demands of family and state. Violet Page was in domestic service. Her regular correspondence with her older brother, Fred, a private in the Middlesex Regiment, betrayed little dissatisfaction with her position

in Brothers in the Great War
Open Access (free)
Linda Maynard

language to express the depth of his loss but later appeared trapped by the fear or distaste that his earlier emotions provoked in him. Both these literary young men faltered in finding the appropriate words to express their grief. Conclusion Personal narratives reveal that brotherly loss unleashed powerful emotions. Fighting and weeping were not mutually exclusive activities. Men’s adherence to codes of manly behaviour and their desire for emotional privacy meant that strong and unsettling feelings often remained hidden from public view. Men’s awareness of the

in Brothers in the Great War
Birgit Lang

traditional boundaries between academic discourse and popular fiction. Where Wulffen had carefully crafted a space for his expert case studies and case stories, new auto­bio­graphical case studies began to appear. Such personal narratives were infused with the respectable language of sexological or psychoanalytic discourse and also romanticised criminal acts. As Wulffen all too clearly realised, this ‘lay’ use of specialist termin­ology affected the popularisation and diffusion of the meaning of such discourses. There is no better way to portray the ambiguous shift in

in A history of the case study
Emigration and the spread of Irish religious influence
Sarah Roddy

Scawen Blunt, The Land War in Ireland being a Personal Narrative of Events (London, 1912), p. 280. As Lawrence McCaffrey has noted, Davitt gave a different version of the encounter, though he was not present, and relayed only what Croke had told him. Michael Davitt, The Fall of Feudalism in Ireland: Or, the Story of the Land League Revolution (Dublin, 1904), p. 400; Lawrence J. McCaffrey, Irish Nationalism and the American Contribution (New York, 1976), p. 420. 126 Larkin, Consolidation, pp. 284–5. [The letter is originally in Italian] 127 Ibid., pp. 282–3. Larkin

in Population, providence and empire