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Ford Madox Ford, the novel and the Great War
Author: Sara Haslam

This book is about Ford Madox Ford, a hero of the modernist literary revolution. Ford is a fascinating and fundamental figure of the time; not only because, as a friend and critic of Ezra Pound and Joseph Conrad, editor of the English Review and author of The Good Soldier, he shaped the development of literary modernism. But, as the grandson of Ford Madox Brown and son of a German music critic, he also manifested formative links with mainland European culture and the visual arts. In Ford there is the chance to explore continuity in artistic life at the turn of the last century, as well as the more commonly identified pattern of crisis in the time. The argument throughout the book is that modernism possesses more than one face. Setting Ford in his cultural and historical context, the opening chapter debates the concept of fragmentation in modernism; later chapters discuss the notion of the personal narrative, and war writing. Ford's literary technique is studied comparatively and plot summaries of his major books (The Good Soldier and Parade's End) are provided, as is a brief biography.

Jonathan Atkin

coarsening of sensibility and imagination In his Introduction to a volume similar to that of Guy Chapman’s ‘miscellany of the Great War’, though published almost a decade earlier, C.B. Purdom stated that his overwhelming reaction to the various personal narratives of the Great War that he had edited was one of the senselessness of the whole thing. As a method of State action, it had no positive qualities, while on an individual basis, although men managed to retain in many cases their courage and spirit of self-sacrifice, these qualities had begun to lose their intrinsic

in A war of individuals
Open Access (free)
Theatre and the politics of engagement
Author: Simon Parry

This book is about science in theatre and performance. It explores how theatre and performance engage with emerging scientific themes from artificial intelligence to genetics and climate change. The book covers a wide range of performance forms from the spectacle of the Paralympics Opening Ceremony to Broadway musicals, from experimental contemporary performance and opera to educational theatre, Somali poetic drama and grime videos. It features work by pioneering companies including Gob Squad, Headlong Theatre and Theatre of Debate as well as offering fresh analysis of global blockbusters such as Wicked and Urinetown. The book offers detailed description and analysis of theatre and performance practices as well as broader commentary on the politics of theatre as public engagement with science. It documents important examples of collaborative practice with extended discussion of the Theatre of Debate process developed by Y Touring theatre company, exploration of bilingual theatre-making in East London and an account of how grime MCs and dermatologists ended up making a film together in Birmingham. The interdisciplinary approach draws on contemporary research in theatre and performance studies in combination with key ideas from science studies. It shows how theatre can offer important perspectives on what the philosopher of science Isabelle Stengers has called ‘cosmopolitics’. The book argues that theatre can flatten knowledge hierarchies and hold together different ways of knowing.

Open Access (free)
Sara Haslam

, exploded into the arena of the First World War, finding in it the perfect expression and concentration of itself – when for many the gaps in the personal narrative were forced home.58 But this isn’t only about shellshock. ‘Husbands, sons, fathers were missing. Facts were missing. Everywhere the overwhelming sense was one of lack’, writes Geoff Dyer, suggesting that some kind of more general cultural narrative is under attack.59 Jay Winter attests that ‘the history of bereavement was universal history during and then after the Great War in France, Britain and Germany’; it

in Fragmenting modernism
Beholding young people’s experiences and expressions of care through oral history performance
Kathleen Gallagher and Rachel Turner-King

’. Barry Freeman has recently argued, using an example of Indigenous theatre makers in Canada, that theatre does not simply represent the world, but models ‘alternative ways of being in the now’ ( 2016 : 25). How could oral history performance, through its focus on personal narrative and past memories, open up a space for CYT members to explore ‘alternative ways of being in the now ’? In no way could we have envisaged the extent to which one youth participant, Bruce, would shift his identity from being the often-quiet, unassuming member of the group to the group

in Performing care
Open Access (free)
Caring performance, performing care
Amanda Stuart Fisher

mixing up the number of the day and month on a form and ending up appearing one year older. These simple but potentially catastrophic mistakes are very familiar to anyone who lives with teenagers, who are prone to slip-ups as they find their way in the world, and, in the play, these moments also serve effectively to remind us just how young and vulnerable these young men actually are. The personal narratives of refugeeism and asylum are juxtaposed with video footage revealing the creation of the project itself. The footage depicts a residential trip for the cast to

in Performing care
Open Access (free)
Care and debility in collaborations between non-disabled and learning disabled theatre makers
Dave Calvert

’ lives develop offstage, their personal narratives are continually updated. Contained also involves the onstage presence of a non-disabled figure alongside the learning disabled performers who, like the translator figure in Disabled Theater , stands in for the director and the directorial process. This role is undertaken by Charli Ward, the academy director at Mind the Gap, who works permanently with the actors and whose engagement with them extends far beyond this particular project. Her role in the performance reflects some aspects of directorial authority in

in Performing care
Open Access (free)
Peter Morey

– Such a Long Journey (1991), A Fine Balance (1995), and Family Matters (2002), receive a host of literary prizes, and achieve recognition as one of the most important contemporary writers of postcolonial literature. Mistry draws his inspiration both from sharply recalled childhood experiences and from the upheavals of migration. However, as always with such intense and apparently personal narratives, the relationship between fiction and autobiography is hard to determine. Certainly there are overlaps between the events and life choices of the writer and some of his

in Rohinton Mistry
Open Access (free)
Speaking of Ireland
Colin Graham

lesson which Michelet so painfully learns is, however, a very different one, and might be borne in mind as we construct our future critical Irelands out of our putative Irish pasts. The ‘lost’ organicism of the intellectual is too swiftly conceptualised in temporal terms, which mutate easily into historical terms. Both Stephen and Michelet see their Norquay_03_Ch2 42 22/3/02, 9:46 am 43 Speaking of Ireland distance from ‘the people’ as an occurrence of biography; therefore a slippage to personal narrative, then to cultural narrative, is an enticing mindset for

in Across the margins
Open Access (free)
Sara Haslam

gaps between his past and present self. Gradually, as the picture develops, the children are forgotten. Unwittingly, Ford betrays the need to represent his personal narrative as his own:65 To tell you the strict truth, I made for myself the somewhat singular discovery that I can only be said to have grown up a very short time ago – perhaps three months, perhaps six. I discovered that I had grown up only when I discovered quite suddenly that I was forgetting my own childhood. My own childhood was a thing so vivid that it certainly influenced me, that it certainly

in Fragmenting modernism