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Fetters of an American farmgirl
R.J. Ellis

labour upon his land but rather rides or rambles over it, recurrently in a supervisory capacity (SW, pp. 389, 552, 556). This is, of course, a matter of political economy; Jefferson both celebrates self-sufficiency yet also acknowledges that he is able to enjoy his civilised life through entering the field of commerce. As Charles A. Miller comments: ‘Jefferson wanted it both ways’ in that ‘If American farmers took seriously the doctrines of independence and self-sufficiency, they would not produce for commerce at all’.44 In the same way the dignity of self-sufficient labour

in Special relationships
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Precedents to sustainability in nineteenth-century literature and culture
John Parham

, whether anxiety over ‘environmental crisis’ or the organic, systemic paradigms that underlie scientific and philosophical ecology (2007: 22–6). And yet Derek Wall’s Green History (1994) has a chapter on ‘Sustainable Development’ that includes three nineteenth-century writers – Percy Shelley, George Perkins Marsh and the French utopian socialist François Fourier; John Stuart Mill, in Principles of Political Economy (1920 [1848]), wrote about ‘the stationary state’; 33 34 Discourses of sustainability while Morris envisaged something akin to a sustainable society in

in Literature and sustainability
Gender, sexual difference and knowledge in Bacon’s New Atlantis
Kate Aughterson

Fathers: Patriarchy as a Cultural Ideal’, in Deborah Shugar (ed.), Habits of Thought in the English Renaissance (Berkeley, University of California Press, 1990), pp. 218–49. 28 The Works of Lancelot Andrewes, ed. J. P. Wilson and James Bliss, 11 vols, Library of Anglo-Catholic Theology (Oxford, Oxford University Press, Price_08_Ch8 178 14/10/02, 9:48 am Gender, sexual difference and knowledge 179 1854), vol. 4, p. 272. 29 Mary O’Brien, The Politics of Reproduction (London, Routledge, Paul Kegan, 1981); Gayle Rubin, ‘The traffic in women, notes on the “political

in Francis Bacon’s <i>New Atlantis</i>
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Behind the screen
Chloe Porter

. 22 See Karl Marx, Capital: A Critique of Political Economy , vol. 1, trans. Ben Fowkes (London: Pelican, 1976 ), pp. 163–8; see also Harris and Korda, ‘Introduction: Towards a Materialist Account of Stage Properties’, p. 17. 23 See Gent, Picture and Poetry , pp

in Making and unmaking in early modern English drama
Reading Robinson Crusoe in colonial New Zealand
Jane Stafford

adult emigrant reader as a handbook and guide to the challenges of settlement, a text for the future rather than an evocation of the past. Mavis Reimer, Clare Bradford, and Heather Snell suggest it ‘stands as the touchstone for the narrative of colonial adventure and conquest’; 16 the newspaper The Colonist puts it more prosaically – in Crusoe , ‘thoroughly practical lessons of political economy are embellished with the charms of fiction’. 17 Refiguring Crusoe In keeping with Miles Ogburn’s observation of ‘global networks’ of reading that are ‘local at every

in Worlding the south
Father– daughter incest and the economics of exchange
Jenny DiPlacidi

]. 12 Bower, 251. 13 Gayle Rubin, ‘The Traffic in Women: Notes on the “Political Economy” of Sex’, in Rayna R. Reiter (ed.), Toward an Anthropology of Women (New York: Monthly Review Press, 1975), p. 200. See also Jane Gallop, The Daughter’s Seduction: Feminism and Psychoanalysis

in Gothic incest
The failure and success of a Swedish film diversity initiative
Mara Lee Gerdén

particular  –​the faculties involved for a woman of colour exceed the merely aesthetic. They may imply having to grapple with the fact that a poetics of violence (against our bodies) is assumed as a quality criterion. It may also situate her in a political economy of affects, leaving her with affective waste products that are indigestible. This affective violence actualises, in Whitney’s words, how ‘white privilege is an affective privilege’ (2016: 290). This is also the reason why I will now turn to the concept of ‘racial emotions’ in an attempt to investigate how the

in The power of vulnerability
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Disrupting the critical genealogy of the Gothic
Jenny DiPlacidi

in the 1960s and 1970s as coinciding with and influencing the ways in which the Female Gothic was read in The Gothic , pp. 278–81. 39 Mitchell, pp. 370–8. 40 Gayle Rubin, ‘The Traffic in Women: Notes on the “Political Economy” of Sex’, in Rayna R

in Gothic incest
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Ezra Pound
David Herd

not and is needed?’ (SP, 204—5). At its best, when it is not repeating itself or digressing beyond readability, ABC of Economics is a popularization, as Pound hoped, of Douglas and Silvio Gessell (author of The National Economic Order), the graphic, tubthumping phrasing adding verbal force to the social credit message. And it is important not to underestimate the centrality of this to Pound; few things mattered more to him, as his thinking widened into political economy, than the movement of things from one place to another, the practicalities of which became

in Enthusiast!
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Henry David Thoreau
David Herd

, most fully articulated in Nature, of the harmony between the intellect and the world. Thoreau’s habit on hearing a proposition was, as Emerson said, to controvert it. This is not to imply that as Kant circulated among his contemporaries Thoreau’s response was straightforwardly negative. The suspicion of ‘a load of thought’ is not, then, in any simple-minded way, a ‘no’ to thought, but strikes instead the same relation to a Critique of Pure Reason as Thoreau strikes, in effect, to Marx’s critiques of political economy. Caught in the elaborate apparatus of intellection

in Enthusiast!