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Open Access (free)
George Campbell Gosling

. 185–6. 6 Ibid. , p. 193. 7 Martin Gorsky, ‘The Political Economy of Health Care in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries’ in Mark Jackson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Medicine (Oxford: Oxford

in Payment and philanthropy in British healthcare, 1918–48
George Campbell Gosling

Martin Gorsky, ‘The Political Economy of Health Care in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries’ in Mark Jackson (ed.), The Oxford Handbook of the History of Medicine (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2011), p. 437. 3 Timothy B. Smith, Creating the Welfare State in France, 1880–1940 (Montreal: McGill-Queen's University Press

in Payment and philanthropy in British healthcare, 1918–48
Hysterical tetanus in the Victorian South Pacific
Daniel Simpson

–106. 66 Messer, ‘An enquiry’, 152. See, for example, M. Harrison, ‘Scurvy on sea and land: political economy and natural history, c . 1780– c . 1850’, Journal for Maritime Research , 15 (2013), 7–25. 67 Messer, ‘An enquiry’, 157. 68

in Progress and pathology
Fatigue and the fin de siècle
Steffan Blayney

might possibly be given by degrees to some of the principles and laws which form the basis of our science of political economy’. 68 Physiological research into the ‘laws of fatigue’ focused increasingly on the rate and quantity of ‘useful work’ which the human body was capable of giving out. 69 For psychology, too, questions of fatigue and efficiency provided a means by which researchers could assert the practical utility of their

in Progress and pathology
Open Access (free)
Balancing the self in the twentieth century
Mark Jackson and Martin D. Moore

. 15 Similarly, although advice to balance marriages or to ensure work-life balance was framed explicitly in terms of enabling personal and family health, individualised techniques for achieving ‘balance’, or at least the illusion of balance, represented another manifestation of contemporary political economy and the disciplinary effects of ‘empowerment’ typical of the neo-liberalisation of everyday life. 16 This collection of essays argues that concepts

in Balancing the self
Open Access (free)
Health as moral economy in the long nineteenth century
Christopher Hamlin

. Mandler, ‘Tories and paupers: Christian political economy and the making of the New Poor Law’, Historical Journal , 33 (1990), 81–101. 34 At least on a regional basis, ‘misery’ had a specific medical meaning – like ‘complaint’, it was shorthand for a particular bodily pain ( OED ‘misery’, #6). 35

in Progress and pathology
Ian Kennedy, oversight and accountability in the 1980s
Duncan Wilson

historians, sociologists and anthropologists have criticised bioethics for failing to ask fundamental questions about the political economy of medicine, or of medical power and authority.6 But Kennedy regularly drew attention to the ideological aspects of medical decisions, criticised the focus on high-tech practices and claimed that professional authority infantilised patients. His calls for outside input were attempts to redress this perceived imbalance of power, involving others in ‘the countless decisions taken by doctors which are not medical, but involve questions of

in The making of British bioethics
Open Access (free)
Gareth Millward

inspection schemes in Britain and Norway’, Dynamis , 13 (1993), 29–53. In Britain, the Education (Administrative Provisions) Act 1907 had obliged local authorities to monitor the health of elementary school children. See also John Pickstone, ‘Production, community and consumption: The political economy of twentieth-century medicine’, in Roger Cooter and John Pickstone (eds), Medicine in the Twentieth Century (Abingdon: Routledge, 2003), 1–20. 26 MH 55/936, Diphtheria Prophylaxis: Publicity Campaign for Immunisation. 27 Lewis

in Vaccinating Britain
Dietary advice and agency in North America and Britain
Nicos Kefalas

twentieth century. Notions of agency, for example, can be seen in the context of deepening commitments to neo-liberal theories of political economy, which as David Harvey has suggested propose that ‘human well-being can be best advanced by liberating individual entrepreneurial freedoms and skills within an institutional framework characterized by strong property rights, free markets, and free trade’. 96 The neo-liberal state distanced itself from many responsibilities by placing the onus for maintaining health on

in Balancing the self
George Campbell Gosling

BRI, General Committee Minutes, 21 April 1925. See Steve Sturdy, ‘The Political Economy of Scientific Medicine: Science, Education and the Transformation of Medical Practice in Sheffield, 1890–1922’, Medical History , 3:6 (1992), 144–5. 132 BSC, DM980 (30), Bristol Hospitals Commission, BHF evidence, appendix 1

in Payment and philanthropy in British healthcare, 1918–48