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Contemporary ‘British’ cinema and the nation’s monarchs
Andrew Higson

precisely the fate of the late modern monarchs on film: they are ceremonial monarchs who merely reign, whose actions are limited by constitution and convention, whose political power is severely circumscribed. These are monarchs, then, who accede executive power to the elected politicians, the prime minister and the government. Obliged by constitutional law to stand above politics, their power is thereby

in The British monarchy on screen
Isadora Duncan’s danced revolution
Dana Mills

sought in the language in which Duncan operated, in dance. Her revolution occurs within dance itself, not in the relationship between dance and other systems of signification. Their political power is the ability to affirm a new kind of movement, a new kind of subjectivity, while drawing upon and responding to previous inscriptions on the body. Dance for Duncan is a method of enabling new articulations to be seen and heard. It is a way to affirm the third dancer, dancing unknown systems of signification, who trumps not only the first dancer, representing ballet, but

in Dance and politics
Open Access (free)
The cinematic afterlife of an early modern political diva
Elisabeth Bronfen
and
Barbara Straumann

twentieth century. Discussing Elizabeth I as an early modern political media diva may seem preposterous, and yet our claim is that she anticipates the very enmeshment between celebrity culture and political power that is so particular to the charisma of celebrities in the public arena in the twentieth and early twenty-first century. What is at stake in our discussion is, therefore, a self-consciously ahistorical reading

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
Moving beyond boundaries
Author:

Dance has always been a method of self- expression for human beings. This book examines the political power of dance and especially its transgressive potential. Focusing on readings of dance pioneers Isadora Duncan and Martha Graham, Gumboots dancers in the gold mines of South Africa, the One Billion Rising movement using dance to protest against gendered violence, dabkeh in Palestine and dance as protest against human rights abuse in Israel, the Sun Dance within the Native American Crow tribe, the book focuses on the political power of dance and moments in which dance transgresses politics articulated in words. Thus the book seeks ways in which reading political dance as interruption unsettles conceptions of politics and dance.

Gumboot dance in South Africa
Dana Mills

developed by the miners and yet their control of their lives was manifested in the system of inscription as well as its reception. The dance presents a critical intersection between oppression and the means to transcend it; both inequality and equality. Gumboot dance illuminates what I read as the strong reading of political dance or the independent political power of dance. Let us contract further, from the dark cold mines into the moving and moved bodies of the gumboot dancers. ‘We need to speak for ourselves’: choreographic analysis of gumboot dance Gumboot dancers in

in Dance and politics
Open Access (free)
Mandy Merck

international, masked or made manifest the political power of the British monarchy? 1 Elizabeth II is escorted to the 2012 London Olympics by James Bond (Daniel Craig), as filmed for the BBC by Danny Boyle. In what way is the significance of that institution inflected by the key genres

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
Indigenous media and the Video nas Aldeias project
Paul Henley

As film-making technology was first invented and developed in the West, there is a tendency to assume that all the cultural values associated with its use are therefore ‘Western’. From there, it is a short step to conclude that the diffusion of film-making technology propagates Western values and serves therefore to reinforce Western political power. However, this conclusion begs many intermediate questions. In the first place, although the technology and the conventions associated with its use may indeed have first been developed in the West, this does not

in Beyond observation
Open Access (free)
Woman in a Dressing Gown
Melanie Williams

Anglophobia (‘May the English lose the Middle East soon if the loss of their political power could restore their sense of beauty,’ for example) and virulent misogyny. Woman in a Dressing Gown rejects Godard’s suggestion that the basic situation ‘should at least have been handled with humour. Alas! Alas! Alas! Cukor is not English’. Why is the possible abandonment and unhappiness of a

in British cinema of the 1950s
One Billion Rising, dance and gendered violence
Dana Mills

otherwise inhibited by systems of power. The body is to be transformed and tap into resources it cannot reach under other systems of power. Dance is a political power in and of itself and can operate universally. Or can it? Thus the One Billion Rising movement calls for a twofold spatial transformation: it calls for a transformation of the body as a space which has been invaded, taken away from its owners by structural violence that makes one billion women feel estranged from their own bodies; it calls for the reoccupation of the body as a space. Simultaneously the One

in Dance and politics