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Open Access (free)
Power in cross-border Cooperation

The volume explores a question that sheds light on the contested, but largely cooperative, nature of Arctic governance in the post-Cold War period: How do power relations matter – and how have they mattered – in shaping cross-border cooperation and diplomacy in the Arctic? Through carefully selected case studies – from Russia’s role in the Arctic Council to the diplomacy of indigenous peoples’ organisations – this book seeks to shed light on how power performances are enacted constantly to shore up Arctic cooperation in key ways. The conceptually driven nature of the enquiry makes the book appropriate reading for courses in international relations and political geography, while the carefully selected case studies lend themselves to courses on Arctic politics.

Open Access (free)
A power perspective on Arctic governance
Elana Wilson Rowe

regional multilateralism. The region must be on the brink of a new cold war (a common media representation) or saturated with warm, comprehensive cooperation (a counter-​representation by Arctic states, including Russia). This book avoids testing the outer extremes of these ‘either/​or’ dichotomies about the cross-​border politics of the Arctic. Rather, the volume seeks to pose and explore a question that sheds light on the contested, but largely cooperative, nature of Arctic governance in the post-​Cold War period: how have and how do relations of power matter in

in Arctic governance
New stories on rafted ice
Elana Wilson Rowe

from one another. In any one section about a particular actor, nearly all of the other actor groups required mention in order to deliver a sensible account of key trends and events. In the post-​Cold War period of cooperation, the actor picture becomes even more interconnected in fascinating ways, and the power relations involved in these interconnections is a topic that the subsequent chapters explore. We see indigenous organisations and states seeking to ‘sing from the same songsheet’ to maximise their success, businesses hammering out regulations to be ratified by

in Arctic governance
Open Access (free)
Kerry Longhurst

structure of that nation’s history and experience – its strategic culture, if you will.2 Key issues and developments in German security policy since 1989 form the overall focus of this book, while the more specific question to be dealt with relates to the evolution of German perspectives on the use of military force in international politics in the post-Cold War period, using the concept of strategic culture to interpret the subject matter. As argued in the Introduction, that concept is useful in yielding insights on both theoretical and empirical issues relating to

in Germany and the use of force
Still unique or just one in the crowd?
Karen E. Smith

the Mediterranean/Middle East] to the European Union not only as partners in its external relations but also for the stability and security of our continent and its immediate neighbourhood. The European Union both has a special responsibility and is in a special position to work in close partnership with all of its neighbours to achieve these objectives. Security In the post-Cold War period, a number of violent conflicts have broken out on the EU’s periphery – in the former Soviet Union, south-eastern Europe and Algeria. The EU has not dealt with these crises very

in EU development cooperation
Open Access (free)
Paul Latawski and Martin A. Smith

maintaining the substance of its military co-operation with NATO forces on the ground in Bosnia. On the wider diplomatic front, the Russian government maintained normal diplomatic relations with all NATO governments, including the United States. Although its immediate rhetorical response was subsequently described as being ‘of a pitch unheard in the entire post-Cold War period’, 23 the Yeltsin government was clear from the start

in The Kosovo crisis and the evolution of post-Cold War European security
Open Access (free)
Theorising Arctic hierarchies
Elana Wilson Rowe

of public goods were provided by the United States and the Soviet Union in their respective spheres of influence. In the post-​ Cold War period, the question of whether the USA can act as a fully global hegemon in delivering global public goods is actively debated. At the same time, US dominance in the international system has not been replaced by another power, however unevenly enacted or contested this American hegemonic position has become. This incomplete/​partial hegemony thus ties back into broader debates discussed in the introduction to this volume about

in Arctic governance