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The restructuring of work and production in the international political economy
Louise Amoore

. Paradoxically, both ‘pro-globalisation’ neo-liberal accounts, and so-called ‘anti-globalisation’ accounts reinforce the image of firms as abstract entities, thereby obscuring the webs of power and practice that constitute sites of production – and limiting the potential for a politicisation of the restructuring of work and production. It is the contention of this chapter that dominant representations of the firm within globalisation have underplayed the contested nature of the restructuring of work. Indeed, it has become the vogue to present globalisation as actively

in Globalisation contested
Transnational reflections from Brazilians in London and Maré, Rio de Janeiro
Cathy McIlwaine, Miriam Krenzinger, Yara Evans, and Eliana Sousa Silva

cities (McIlwaine, 2013 ; UN Women, 2015 ), there is therefore an urgent need to explore these relationships. This chapter examines these issues in relation to wider debates on the gender-blindness of right to the city discourse and the importance of considering gender justice and wellbeing in cities (Moser, 2016 ), as well as the need to acknowledge cities as globally connected urban systems underpinned by gendered power relations (Peake and Reiker, 2013 ). The discussion draws empirically on the transnational nature of urban VAWG among Brazilian migrant women in

in Urban transformations and public health in the emergent city
Open Access (free)
Urban presence and uncertain futures in African cities
Michael Keith and Andreza Aruska de Souza Santos

of this volume has a significant implication for the organisation of the academy. Academic power commonly reflects deeper economic and historical relations, privileging particular sites of knowledge production. This edited collection argues that twenty-first-century urban research, particularly in an African context, demands new forms of collaboration that recognise these institutional configurations. These include collaborations between cities and scholars – scholars working across disciplinary boundaries in the humanities, natural sciences and social sciences

in African cities and collaborative futures
Louise Amoore

continues to represent power as something that is wielded by elite global actors, thus rendering the ‘ordinary’ realms of work and labour secondary concerns to finance and production. I identify the central elements of an IPE of social practice which, I propose, makes everyday practices such as work visible and amenable to inquiry. Orthodox perspectives in IPE IPE as a field of inquiry, a set of questions and a range of assumptions, is a highly contested discipline (Tooze, 1984). Indeed, it is perhaps misleading to consider IPE to be a discipline at all, given that it is

in Globalisation contested
Open Access (free)
An international political economy of work
Louise Amoore

social change is needed if everyday spheres such as work, family, consumption and leisure are to be understood as key realms of globalising social relations. Orthodox IPE perspectives – conceiving of opposed realms of state and market, domestic and international, and of power and knowledge as resources – have rendered invisible precisely those realms of social life where the meanings of globalisation are constituted. This book has engaged in some reflection on the dominant ways of thinking that have shaped IPE’s research agenda. I have asked how particular readings of

in Globalisation contested
Open Access (free)
Unheard voices and invisible agency
Louise Amoore

-corporatist’, run in a seamless web of power with the practices of unprotected workers in the less developed countries (LDCs) of the ‘South’, and with the ‘invisible’ work undertaken in the informal sectors of Amoore_Global_07_Ch6 137 6/19/02, 1:49 PM Globalisation contested 138 the ‘North’. For a contract worker in a British production plant, the everyday practices of Mexican workers producing the same component for the client corporation may be far more proximate than geography would dictate, and may be expressed ambiguously in terms of competition and insecurity, or in

in Globalisation contested
Open Access (free)
Tuur Driesser

. Maps as objects 225 From critical to object-oriented cartography The critical cartography which arose in the 1990s (Crampton and Krygier, 2006) approach maps as texts (Harley, 1989), sign systems (Wood, 1993) and social constructions (Crampton, 2001). In response to the dominance of the communication model, which thought of maps purely as neutral tools to convey geographical information, critical cartography sought to demonstrate how these representations were in fact bound up with politics of power and knowledge. Thus, building on Foucault and Derrida (Harley, 1989

in Time for mapping
Louise Amoore

amorphous, ‘vague in referent’ and ‘ambiguous in usage’ (Jones, Amoore_Global_02_Ch1 14 6/19/02, 12:06 PM Globalisation, restructuring and flexibility 15 1995: 1). Indeed, some have concluded that the term should be abandoned to prevent its reification in political, academic and corporate debates. However, it is precisely the amorphous and empty nature of the concept that gives it the capacity to exercise power. It can be filled with multiple meanings and used to legitimate a range of restructuring programmes, from labour market flexibility and mobility, to

in Globalisation contested
Open Access (free)
Louise Amoore

6 Introduction T he mood is shifting in the contemporary globalisation debate. Only a few years ago, talk of the contested and politicised nature of globalisation would have met with scepticism from those who emphasise the sheer economic power of globalising forces. The orthodox popular and academic representations of globalisation have for several decades sustained the image of a powerful economic and technological bulldozer that effortlessly shovels up states and societies. The very discourse of the ‘competition state’ (Cerny, 1990) effectively sanitised

in Globalisation contested
Inclusive urban energy transformations in spaces of urban inequality
Federico Caprotti, Jon Phillips, Saska Petrova, Stefan Bouzarovski, Stephen Essex, Jiska de Groot, Lucy Baker, Yachika Reddy, and Peta Wolpe

might take. Historically, South Africa's industrial policy has been dominated by the availability of cheap electricity, which was generated using the country's cheap and plentiful coal reserves to power the expansion of the mining and minerals-beneficiation industry. As a result, the country's ‘minerals-energy complex’ became dominant in protecting the requirement for, and monopoly of, cheap power coupled with cheap labour (Fine and Rustomjee, 1997 ). These interests became institutionalised by the state with the 1922 establishment of the state

in African cities and collaborative futures