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Time and space
Saurabh Dube

subaltern studies powerfully pointed in newer historical directions, the endeavor also appeared as privileging the spectacular moments of the subalterns’ overt rebellions over these people’s more routine, everyday negotiations of power. This suggested, in turn, inadequate, abbreviated articulations of culture and consciousness, of religion and caste, within the project. Unsurprisingly, seeking a research

in Subjects of modernity
Rousseau as a constitutionalist
Mads Qvortrup

necessity of checks and balances on power. First, however, an overview of the debate as it has evolved through the different epochs of political history. Absolutism and constitutionalism Lord Acton is often cited for the dictum ‘power corrupts – and absolute power corrupts absolutely’ (Letter to Bishop Mandell Creighton). It followed from this – at least according to Acton – that power had to be checked and restricted, for example through constitutional courts, a royal veto, or powerful second chambers. We will call this view ‘constitutionalism’. Yet this school is not

in The political philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Open Access (free)
Andrew Bowie

’, like Jean-François Lyotard, has its roots in the work of Heidegger, and the power of Heidegger’s ideas is also evident in the way they have influenced many contemporary theories of modernity. However, Heidegger’s most notable arguments have themselves roots in the work of German Idealist and early Romantic thinkers, and Heidegger’s thinking from the 1930s onwards is, significantly, never far away from questions concerning art.1 What links him to these thinkers from the early modern era is his questioning of the assumption that truth is adequately defined in terms of

in Aesthetics and subjectivity
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Identities and incitements
Saurabh Dube

groupings. Upon such an understanding, then, identities comprise a crucial means through which social processes are perceived, experienced, and articulated. Indeed, defined within historical relationships of production and reproduction, appropriation and approbation, and power and difference, cultural identities (and their mutations) are essential elements in the quotidian constitution (and pervasive transformations

in Subjects of modernity
Andrew Bowie

of one’s predecessors got one in touch with a power other than oneself ’, such as the ‘Will to Power’ (Rorty 1989 p. 107). When Nietzsche does this, Rorty argues, he rejoins the metaphysics he opposes with other aspects of his thought, and is therefore open to the same kind of objections as are appropriate in relation to anyone in the tradition of strong foundationalist thinking. The aptness of this criticism will become apparent when we consider some of Nietzsche’s responses to the questions we have been concerned with so far. However, there is a further objection

in Aesthetics and subjectivity
Mads Qvortrup

. Rather his solution was to recapture the lost innocence of mankind through negative education (with the occasional Chap005.p65 96 11/09/03, 13:35 The last of the ancients the first of the moderns? 97 institutional incentive thrown in alongside the pedagogic efforts). Political institutions were necessary, as discussed earlier in this work. Yet, Rousseau never succumbed to the illusion that perfect constitutional arrangements could lead to a perfect society. Nor, indeed, would society be much improved if even the wisest men were to be given the reigns of power

in The political philosophy of Jean-Jacques Rousseau
Philip Nanton

Gonsalves, who took power in 2001 and is in his fourth term as I write. This range of literary genres – journal, memoir, novel-as-thriller and novel-as-fictionalised-memoir – gives rise to intriguing inter-textual considerations. Despite disparities in period, narrative perspective, implied readership and authorial position, thematic similarities and common literary devices are strongly

in Frontiers of the Caribbean
Will Kymlicka and Sue Donaldson

as tourists are subject to coercion they may well have rights to equal protection of the law and to contest the arbitrary exercise of power, but that is different from the right of members of society to inclusion in the demos. The case of the metics shows that citizenship is not ultimately about being affected by particular decisions or being subject to particular laws, but about membership in a self-governing society. People living in

in Democratic inclusion
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An introduction
Saurabh Dube

in recent decades. 1 I indicate three such sets of queries here. 2 The first set concerns vigorous challenges to univocal conceptions of universal history under the terms of modernity. Imaginatively exploring distinct pasts that were forged within wider intermeshed matrices of power, such emphases have questioned pervasive imperatives of historical progress and the very nature of the historical

in Subjects of modernity
Open Access (free)
What does race have to do with the Yugoslav region?
Catherine Baker

formation, forced migration and genocide that invite seeing its past and present through the lens of ethnopolitical and religious conflict. Moreover, as part of ‘eastern’ rather than ‘western’ Europe, and without its own history as an imperial power, it did not experience the mass migration from outside ‘Europe’ of millions of people whose identities would be racialised as non-white. Studies of how ideas of ‘race’ have circulated and been adapted across the globe, for their part, themselves still almost always pass over the east of Europe and its state socialist past. The

in Race and the Yugoslav region