Search results

Open Access (free)
Incest and beyond
Jenny DiPlacidi

power reflective of patriarchy’s control over female bodies. Moving away from divisions of the genre can, nevertheless, provide new insights into the concerns and anxieties explored through generic conventions as common to writers of any gender and various political and religious beliefs, in such a way as to reveal that eighteenth-century explorations of natural rights and laws, female desire

in Gothic incest
Open Access (free)
Disrupting the critical genealogy of the Gothic
Jenny DiPlacidi

violent pursuit of his niece positions the female as passive victim to an aggressive male sexuality that, while condemned for its violation of the incest taboo, nonetheless adheres to a familiar structure of power and sexuality. The reactions to these different configurations of incest in The Mysterious Mother and The Castle of Wolfenbach reveal a marked discomfort with incestuous behaviour that

in Gothic incest
Open Access (free)
Female sexual agency and male victims
Jenny DiPlacidi

. That research across a range of fields suggests there are links between positions of power, non-maternal instincts and dangerous sexual promiscuity illuminates the sociopolitical investment in maintaining the myth of biologically determined gender ideologies. These ideologies, enforced by the mother’s position as nurturer or deviant, are equally informed by the sexual politics of power and desire as

in Gothic incest
Open Access (free)
Thefts, violence and sexual threats
Jenny DiPlacidi

from their presence, a new paradigm of incest as both mutually enforcing and threatening to the patriarchal power structure and hegemony emerges. Maggie Kilgour says of Walpole’s The Castle of Otranto ( 1764 ) that the conclusion is ‘a tidy way of suddenly resolving, in a highly oedipal text, the potential conflict between past and present, or guilt about the

in Gothic incest
Re-examining paradigms of sibling incest
Jenny DiPlacidi

figures. The relationships between female characters and their brothers or brother-substitutes are often fraught with underlying incestuous desires that are expressed as hidden subtext or explicit incestuous love. In contrast to the potential for abuses of power with which father–daughter relationships are endowed by the nature of the familial bond, the relationships between siblings are grounded in a

in Gothic incest
Father– daughter incest and the economics of exchange
Jenny DiPlacidi

informed by the equation of father–daughter incest with abuses of power contribute to readings of these relationships as reflective of the abuses inherent in the emerging nuclear family and domestic spaces. 4 These understandings have focused scholarly readings of father–daughter incest in the Gothic on locating the perceived or real threats against the heroine within the home or castle. I argue that in

in Gothic incest
Open Access (free)
Cousins and the changing status of family
Jenny DiPlacidi

) The restoration of her name and fortune positions her as legitimate kin with wealth – a viable option for Delamere now that her uncle desires their marriage to regain the lost estate and money. Emmeline’s reflection demonstrates what Hoeveler describes as the ‘sense of powerlessness experienced by a woman in the grip of two generations of patriarchal power’. 39 The status of niece is paradoxical

in Gothic incest
Open Access (free)
‘Gothicism’, ‘historicism’, and the overlap of fictional modes from Thomas Leland to Walter Scott
Christina Morin

and the rational continues with William's description of D’Aumont, one of Mal-leon's spies. Taken in by D’Aumont's lies, William ‘resign[s] [him]self entirely to the influence of this new friend, whose power was like that of those infernal imps who, they say, command the winds to roar or be still, and the waves to swell or to subside, as their wicked purposes require’ ( Longsword , vol. 1, p. 43). Explaining himself further, William suggests that he had been bewitched: Hast thou never heard that

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Open Access (free)
Regina Maria Roche, the Minerva Press, and the bibliographic spread of Irish gothic fiction
Christina Morin

restorative power of travel when combined with an ‘inquisitive mind’ and ‘ardent imagination’. 2 In this, the novel resonates with The old Irish baronet and The tradition of the castle , portraying Delamere and his various movements as the key to a new transnationally inflected Irishness. 3 Roche's novel further reflects on the usefulness of travel in the negotiation of nineteenth-century Irish identities through its exploration of the literary endeavours of its second protagonist, Eugene O’Neil. Presenting

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
Open Access (free)
Romances, novels, and the classifications of Irish Romantic fiction
Christina Morin

and Woodville may suggest the text's commitment to the tenet put forward by the narrator of The heroine , that ‘to make the world laugh … is the gravest occupation an author can chuse’ ( The heroine , p. 6), the novel is nevertheless very serious about the dangers faced by the average middle- and upper-class female in a patriarchal world. Writing to her friend and confidante about her uncle's insistence that she marry Dick, Sophia naively declares, ‘Thank heaven it is not in his power (nor I hope will not be in his inclination) to force me into so preposterous an

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829