Search results

You are looking at 1 - 10 of 11 items for :

  • "recognition" x
  • Art, Architecture and Visual Culture x
Clear All
Open Access (free)
Design and material culture in Soviet Russia, 1960s–80s
Author: Yulia Karpova

The major part of this book project was funded by the European Union’s Horizon 2020 research and innovation programme under the Marie Sklodowska-Curie grant agreement No. 700913.

This book is about two distinct but related professional cultures in late Soviet Russia that were concerned with material objects: industrial design and decorative art. The Russian avant-garde of the 1920s is broadly recognised to have been Russia’s first truly original contribution to world culture. In contrast, Soviet design of the post-war period is often dismissed as hackwork and plagiarism that resulted in a shabby world of commodities. This book identifies the second historical attempt at creating a powerful alternative to capitalist commodities in the Cold War era. It offers a new perspective on the history of Soviet material culture by focusing on the notion of the ‘comradely object’ as an agent of progressive social relations that state-sponsored Soviet design inherited from the avant-garde. It introduces a shared history of domestic objects, handmade as well as machine-made, mass-produced as well as unique, utilitarian as well as challenging the conventional notion of utility. Situated at the intersection of intellectual history, social history and material culture studies, this book elucidates the complexities and contradictions of Soviet design that echoed international tendencies of the late twentieth century. The book is addressed to design historians, art historians, scholars of material culture, historians of Russia and the USSR, as well as museum and gallery curators, artists and designers, and the broader public interested in modern aesthetics, art and design, and/or the legacy of socialist regimes.

Open Access (free)
Soviet things that talk
Yulia Karpova

in particular can benefit from new KARPOVA 9781526139870 PRINT.indd 2 16/09/2020 09:16 Introduction 3 materialist optics in reconsidering the history of interrelations between humans, objects and nature.12 This decentralisation of ‘heroic’ designers and increased attention to materiality provides broad opportunities for examining design under state socialism. While collectivist institutional culture and planned economies precluded designers from obtaining full-fledged individual recognition, let alone stardom, material culture and consumption continuously

in Comradely objects
Open Access (free)
Janet Wolff

in 1917. On 30 June 1919, Ernest Rutherford (the ‘father of nuclear physics’) wrote a short reference for her: [ 217 ] She proved herself an unusually able student and her work both theoretical and practical was very well done. In her final year she did a number of advanced experiments in Optics and commenced an investigation in that subject. In recognition of her ability she was awarded the Hatfield Scholarship. I consider Miss Ellis to be an unusually well qualified physicist as she is strong both in the mathematical and the experimental side. Her final year

in Austerity baby
Open Access (free)
Janet Wolff

whose words do not identify and differentiate in the same way. Linguistic difference does, though, have implications for the use and status of particular colours in that culture. And it does remind us that our own categorisations and hierarchies (primary, secondary, complementary) are in an important sense arbitrary. Wittgenstein said as much in 1950, when he insisted that identification of colour is always a language-game. If the identification and recognition of colour cannot be assumed across place and time, then neither can any intrinsic meaning or symbolism of a

in Austerity baby
Yulia Karpova

of expressive, modern electronic devices should always be balanced. After all, ‘what is most essential is integrity, interconnectedness and compositional unity. It is not even that important if these are achieved by contrast or by similarity.’2 This text illustrates remarkably Soviet design professionals’ recognition of the active role of objects in the home. Hitherto unknown objects that differed in their formal and functional qualities, in particular the ‘newcomers’ such as the TV set or vacuum cleaner, forced the inhabitants to think differently about their home

in Comradely objects
Open Access (free)
Janet Wolff

, and considered the small risk of contamination by ingestion (mainly through milk) minimal, and satisfactorily dealt with. Marilynne Robinson’s outrage was about what she saw as a gross understatement of risk and actual harm, and at the time of publication of her book she was challenged on this. The fiftieth anniversary of the accident prompted further thought, with the benefit of new scientific and meteorological research, including the recognition that there were likely to have been more cases of cancer attributable to the leak. Even so, the numbers are small

in Austerity baby
Yulia Karpova

contemplation and recognition of the ‘complexity behind simplicity’.10 Drawing on this argument, I suggest noticing the variations within the tendency of decorative art towards simplification and rationalisation. Objects such as carpets, curtains, ceramics and glass, produced in smaller or larger series by specialised factories, would act as vivid foci to accentuate the well-ordered minimalist interiors around them, a role of Soviet applied art often noted by art historians.11 Just as electronic devices ought to differ strikingly from modular furniture, as the critic

in Comradely objects
Open Access (free)
Janet Wolff

baby [ 110 ] The theme of the ‘fallen woman’ is a familiar one in Victorian Britain, from Thomas Hardy’s Tess of the D’Urbervilles and Elizabeth Gaskell’s novel Ruth to the many paintings depicting the familiar narrative: innocence, seduction, prostitution and, finally, death by drowning. One of the best known of these paintings is Holman Hunt’s The Awakening Conscience of 1853, shown at the Royal Academy in 1854 – a painting multiply coded to register both the sin and the moment of its recognition. In a letter to Hunt, Rossetti is keen to point out that he had

in Austerity baby
Open Access (free)
Janet Wolff

a year at the same time, is a short distance along the coast, on the outskirts of Douglas.) Rather ironically, these months were the best of times for Schwitters in the eleven years between his departure from Germany in 1937 and his death in January 1948. In Norway he had financial troubles; his collage work and avant-garde sculpture were not understood; and he was often under suspicion as a German. After his release from the internment camp in November 1941, his health was very poor and his financial circumstances dire. In England too he failed to get recognition

in Austerity baby
Yulia Karpova

both on unique pieces and on prototypes for mass production at the same time?’), to, finally, future plans and projects. The first question revealed the affective relation of an artist to his or her material: the intertwined recognition of its ‘thing-power’ and the will to master it. This dialectic was made especially vivid in the response by Adolf Kurilov, an artist at the famous Gus’ Khrustal’nyi factory (Vladimir oblast): glass ‘can be cut, moulded, faceted, etched, blown, engraved, glued, frosted, and fused with ceramics; one can paint over it with a brush and

in Comradely objects