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From an ‘infrastructural turn’ to the platform logics of logistics
Michael Keith and Andreza Aruska de Souza Santos

cities through multiple drivers that distinguished unevenly between urban concentrations on the planet. Such diversity reflected distinctive combinations of social and material conditions in different cities that qualify the propensity of cities to respond to sudden change, partially traced to what has been described as an ‘infrastructural turn’ in studies of the contemporary city. As we suggested in the introduction, the recognition of the powers of combination of social, cultural and material forms at the heart of the putative ‘infrastructural

in African cities and collaborative futures
Open Access (free)
City DNA, public health and a new urban imaginary
Michael Keith and Andreza Aruska de Souza Santos

of a cable-car system that began to bridge the separation of the formal city and the sequestered and informal barrios. Recognition of the social capital and cultural dimensions of mobility addresses specifically the social equity dimensions of integrating the city, building welfare, social and cultural facilities along the route of the cable car and reconfiguring the staging of gender relations and the calculus of safety in the city (Kaufmann, Bergman and Joye, 2004 ; Levy, 2013 ; Levy et al., 2017 ). Along the intersections of the cable-car network, the city

in Urban transformations and public health in the emergent city
Open Access (free)
Urban presence and uncertain futures in African cities
Michael Keith and Andreza Aruska de Souza Santos

incommensurable truths revealed by economic reason alongside other forms of ‘science’. For Krugman it also opens up a different sort of exchange in city halls and policy domains where he finds himself too often ‘arguing with zombies’, ‘ideas that should have been killed by contrary evidence, but instead keep shambling along, eating people's brains’ (Krugman, 2020 : 4). Such an alternative form of dialogue could involve a recognition that it is possible to acknowledge that you may ‘have your own opinions but not your own facts’ yet also recognises that these facts may reflect

in African cities and collaborative futures
The restructuring of work in Britain
Louise Amoore

recognition (see Rifkin, 1995). However, conceptions and experiences of working time are highly contingent and contested, and the restructuring of working time is a profoundly political exercise, and not an automatic technological reality. The restructuring of working time for maximum flexibility is programmatically highly ambiguous. Consider, for example, the contingency of meaning applied to flexible working time: the possibilities range from the complete ownership and abuse of temporal experience by an employer, as in bonded or slave labour, to the ‘family friendly

in Globalisation contested
Reinventing depression among Rio de Janeiro urban dwellers
Leandro David Wenceslau and Francisco Ortega

physical symptoms among more elite and industrialised populations and to the identification of psychological manifestations through ‘culturally adapted’ questionnaires in less Westernised groups. However, controversies remain with regard to the existence of a set of symptoms, however varied in their composition, that can be seen to globally represent a case of depression: critics point to the risk of incurring a categorical fallacy, that is, a selective recognition of manifestations and phenomena produced by the interest in identifying a certain category within a

in Urban transformations and public health in the emergent city
Nikolas Rose

recognition of the constitutive transformations between ‘the biological’ and ‘the sociocultural’ across the ‘life course’. The words are becoming familiar. Epigenetics, the processes of gene activation and de-activation across an individual’s life, in response to inputs from the milieu. Neuroplasticity, the fact that neural circuits are shaped and reconfigured across the life course, both in terms of structure and in terms of function in response to experiences. Neurogenesis, the production and integration of new nerve cells, to replace those that are dead or damaged, a

in Urban transformations and public health in the emergent city
Open Access (free)
Unheard voices and invisible agency
Louise Amoore

‘as resource’ in our studies and to seek out ‘power-wielding’ people as the subjects of our research. Work is thus equated with monetised economic activity, and workers are conceptualised as a commodity, so that for those whose working practices are unprotected or subordinate, there is little or no recognition in IR/IPE research. In a sense, it is assumed that those who do not possess power as a resource are not significant to understandings of the GPE. Unprotected workers are the passive victims of someone else’s power. It is this ‘someone else’ whom orthodox (and

in Globalisation contested
Open Access (free)
Urban transformation and public health in future cities
Michael Keith and Andreza Aruska de Souza Santos

volume we have drawn together a series of contributions that address pressing issues of urban public health. Our starting points are twofold. The first is the recognition that in the twenty-first century the majority of the globe’s urban populations will live in cities. The cities of continents that are at the heart of this volume in Latin America, Europe, Africa and Asia demonstrate different trajectories of historical and contemporary urbanisation and futures of urban growth. The examples we have brought together from cities in Brazil, UK, China and Africa are

in Urban transformations and public health in the emergent city
Luiz Eduardo Soares

subject to the master’s emotions, and it does not imply any recognition of the human nature of the Other, the woman who is desired. The real woman under the guise of a slave is a real human being, a subject, and is somewhere else, beyond the master’s reach, his power, his values and his logic. The second body of the slave is reduced to a fantasy phallocentric projection and the extension of patriarchal authority, even though the woman who is coveted may provisionally identify with this second body and inhabit it in a similar way to a visitor to a theme park. From the

in Urban transformations and public health in the emergent city
Mark Pelling, Alejandro Barcena, Hayley Leck, Ibidun Adelekan, David Dodman, Hamadou Issaka, Cassidy Johnson, Mtafu Manda, Blessing Mberu, Ezebunwa Nwokocha, Emmanuel Osuteye, and Soumana Boubacar

Population and Health Research Center (APHRC) through the Nairobi Urban Health and Demographic Surveillance System from 2002 to date and the Nairobi cross-sectional slum surveys of 2000 and 2012. In further recognition of the need to address fragmentation in DRM there have been recent calls from city actors, particularly the Nairobi City County, to develop a shared platform for information sharing and collaboration. Significantly, the Nairobi Urban Risk Partnership was proposed at an exploratory meeting initiated and facilitated by Urban ARK at the

in African cities and collaborative futures