Lessons Learned for Engagement in Fragile and Conflict-Affected States
Logan Cochrane

). One reason that one might expect to see a rise of evaluation work over time within South Sudan is because of a recognition by donors in the 2000s that thousands of interventions had taken place but there was a dearth of evidence about what impacts had resulted ( Bennett et al. , 2010 ; Norad, 2016 ). These donors have continued to operate in the newly independent Republic of South Sudan, many of which have published evaluation reports identified by this study. Synthesis of Lessons Learned The following synthesis of lessons learned is presented based on

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
A Response to the Journal of Humanitarian Affairs Special Issue on Innovation in Humanitarian Action (JHA, 1:3)
Anna Skeels

that needs to be in place for responsible innovation in a humanitarian setting. We also capture what participation might mean at different phases of the innovation process, for example in relation to the problem recognition stage: When the local community are engaged in problem identification through inclusive, user-centred design processes, people in these local organisations – using their local knowledge – hold often-untapped potential to develop game-changing innovations. ( Elrha, 2018a ) A promising partnership between Elrha and MIT’s D-Lab is enabling us to

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Olivia Umurerwa Rutazibwa

though the international community had found its way to the capital, Hargeisa, Somaliland had arguably become the most stable democracy in the region, even as it awaited international recognition of its independence. It seemed to me, therefore, that the most salient question was not how intervention could be more effective and efficient, but whether it was necessary in the first place. Was Western presence itself constitutive of the problems facing ‘host’ countries? In her recent book Decolonising Intervention: International Statebuilding in

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Gender Equality and Culture in Humanitarian Action
Ricardo Fal-Dutra Santos

( Enloe, 2004 : chapter 12). More relevantly, gender norms shape specific violent behaviour of concern to humanitarian actors, such as sexual violence during conflict ( Enloe, 2004 : chapter 7). Despite the growing recognition of the impact of culture on the behaviour of primary duty bearers (e.g. Terry and McQuinn, 2018 ), humanitarian efforts remain confined to engaging primary duty bearers themselves, and to influencing specific forms of

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Why Building Back Better Means More than Structural Safety
Bill Flinn

is not likely to harm anyone; it is not so easy if a low-quality concrete building might precipitously collapse in an earthquake potentially causing serious injury or even death to the inhabitants 8 . Two considerations help to take the agony out of the decision. The first is the recognition that safety is just one of the many factors that defines a good house. It may really be the case that a healthy house is more important than a safe house especially if the prevailing hazard is not that likely to threaten life. The second is the probable lack of funds, both

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Humanitarianism in a Post-Liberal World Order
Stephen Hopgood

even hostile to wider norms and interests, attacks on civilians, IDPs and refugees and aid workers have grown. Fears of scarcity, feelings of injustice, lack of recognition and enervating insecurity have all taken their toll. The room for humanism has reduced as a result. We can see this in the backlash against human rights and the erosion of humanitarian space. Indeed, in what follows, I will suggest that without liberal world order, global humanitarianism as we currently understand it is impossible. Governments of rising powers, increasingly

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Corporations, Celebrities and the Construction of the Entrepreneurial Refugee Woman
Annika Bergman Rosamond and Catia Gregoratti

who have suffered at the hands of conflict, violence and war, there is a tendency to essentialise such traumatic experiences, rather than treating them as lived and intersectionally subjective. Those representations, nonetheless, are coupled with the recognition that refugee women are ‘more than the labels to which they are assigned’, being ‘savvy entrepreneurs, mothers and students, with hopes and dreams’ ( Campese, 2018 ), whose lives are also defined by

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Sophie Roborgh

population that drives this monitoring strategy. However, accounts of incidents are not just a means to an end, they are an end in themselves. By reflecting a victim’s lived experience, they become important accounts of speaking out and témoignage , processes that have intrinsic value. The act of witnessing, for example, bears witness to something ‘beyond recognition’, and constitutes a deeply personal experience ( Oliver, 2001 ). Unequal accessibility to the

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Open Access (free)
Digital Bodies, Data and Gifts
Kristin Bergtora Sandvik

, sweat, sperm and tears; and the capture of individual characteristics, including DNA, fingerprints, iris scans and voice and face recognition. Wearables are constituted through regulation and legalities: a plethora of ethical and legal norms and rules shape and constrain the development of wearables and their affordances. The main regulatory frames for wearables are data-protection and privacy laws, consumer regulation and human rights law, which govern research

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs
Catherine Akurut

), ‘ Conflict-Related Sexual Violence against Males: Recognition by and Responses of Humanitarian Organisations in Africa ’ ( Unpublished doctoral thesis , Nelson Mandela University , Port Elizabeth ). All Survivors Project (ASP) ( 2017 ), Legacies and Lessons: Sexual Violence against Men and Boys in Sri Lanka and Bosnia and Herzegovina

Journal of Humanitarian Affairs