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Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

distinctive melodramatic shift in Stone’s work, and a shift towards the darker aspects of parental love in particular. The contention here is that in the rush to classify U Turn as a noir thriller, critics and observers of Stone not only pre-​emptively closed the door on any recognition of the film’s overt melodrama, but also in later reappraisals continued to miss a bigger opportunity to find Lo v e a key interpretive clue to Stone’s personal as well as cinematic development. Then, the significance of a melodramatic filter for viewing Stone’s later films is used to

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

with Anthony Hopkins and the independent Cinergi [Pictures], distributing through Disney. Warners did get re-​involved with Any Given Sunday and with Alexander, where they became involved reluctantly. That was then the end of my relationship with Warners. With World Trade Center, Paramount were very happy. World Trade Center was their ideal movie: serious, Oscar-​worthy and made money. However, there was no recognition from the Academy. After that, Paramount would not make Pinkville –​and that’s when they supposedly liked me. So you have to be a gypsy, you have to

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Open Access (free)
Ian Scott and Henry Thompson

, point of national recognition and window into Stone’s preoccupations, the film remains a crucial component in any retrospective. Platoon In July 1976, Stone began work on a screenplay that, in time, would concretise not just his perspective on Vietnam, but his position as a filmmaker in Hollywood. It was populated almost entirely with a cast of characters and events from his period of active service Wa r in 1967–​68, and the retelling was as much an act of personal catharsis as it was any desire to speak the truth about the situation there. The immediate effect of

in The cinema of Oliver Stone
Mandy Merck

Diana’s funeral begin and the Princess be laid to rest, and with her the threat she presents to the Queen’s authority. To make this happen, melodrama, with its pathos, its appeal for moral recognition and its highly expressive mise-en-scène , must, in both a political and an aesthetic sense, dominate the docudrama. The DVD cover of The Queen announces this generic contest with an eloquent image

in The British monarchy on screen
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The Admirable Crichton and Look Back in Anger
Stephen Lacey

More’. 9 By the standards of the period, the film is a fairly free adaptation, with the island sequences shot on location. However, the film keeps, to a large extent, the main events of the play’s narrative, many of its jokes and much of its important dialogue. The main alterations to the narrative are to do with an explicit recognition of its star’s particular talents and an implicit acknowledgement

in British cinema of the 1950s
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The King’s Speech as melodrama
Nicola Rehling

, melodrama is often structured around the path of unacknowledged, wronged and suffering virtue, and the staging of its ultimate triumph and/or recognition. 18 In this Manichean universe, Brooks argues, characters rarely have interior depth; rather, since ‘melodrama exteriorizes conflict and psychic structures’, they embody ethical imperatives or psychic signs. 19 These ethical imperatives or emotional states may be

in The British monarchy on screen
Open Access (free)
Quentin Crisp as Orlando’s Elizabeth I
Glyn Davis

announced as the character Harriet, who is really cross-dressing Harry. The choice of this image by Woolf, then, operates as playful recognition that the dress of the gentry – and, as a result of the resemblance to Elizabeth I, the stylings of the monarchy – can serve as a spectacular gendered performance that obscures the sexed body beneath. In Sally Potter’s film, it is worth noting, Archduke Harry (John Wood) does not

in The British monarchy on screen
An allegory of imperial rapport
Deirdre Gilfedder

In March 2014 to the surprise of many in Australia, the Prime Minister, Tony Abbott, announced the reintroduction of the titles of Knight and Dame into the Australian honours list. The titles, given in recognition of public service in various domains, hark back to an imperial tradition that was eliminated in 1986 by the Australian government and replaced with a national system

in The British monarchy on screen
The Spanish Gardener and its analogues
Alison Platt

Waltons’ part way through out of recognition of his talent, as occurs in Billy Elliot . In effect the family Billy Elliot has at the end of the film is not the family he has at the beginning: they change; he doesn’t. 4 In Kes the opposite is true – the child grows, the family remains static, which is at least a more truthful response to childhood

in British cinema of the 1950s
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Woman in a Dressing Gown
Melanie Williams

able to identify with the characters, and explains how the character of Amy has meant something to women all over the world: ‘Argentinian, German, Swedish, Dutch and British women have told me that they “know Amy”, that a woman like this lives “next door” or “along the road”.’ 21 However, the women’s recognition of Amy is not personal identification but outward identification; she is not like them

in British cinema of the 1950s