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Disrupting the critical genealogy of the Gothic
Jenny DiPlacidi

, the recognition of which fact highlights the fluidity of conceptions of family, sexuality and desire. The feelings of those in the consanguineal family towards their non-kin relatives are crucial in establishing whether or not an individual is regarded as family and thus if erotic desires constitute incestuous desires. 73 In the Gothic the incest taboo acts as a vehicle through

in Gothic incest
Father– daughter incest and the economics of exchange
Jenny DiPlacidi

’s work was shaped by contemporary novels and political allegories of which he would certainly have been aware. 41 Walpole described his writing of Otranto as a type of therapy ‘during a particularly bad year in parliament’, which evidences his recognition of the tale’s function as a political parody. Sue Chaplin examines ‘the fictions of origin Walpole himself generated in respect of this aberrant

in Gothic incest
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The cartographic consciousness of Irish gothic fiction
Christina Morin

as a playwright and comedies such as The platonic wife (1765), The double mistake (1766), The school for rakes (1769), and A wife in the right (1772). While her fiction has been ‘appreciated’ by scholars, 20 it is telling that only one of her three novels has appeared in a modern edition, whereas her plays have all recently been anthologised. 21 Kilfeather's pioneering work on Irish gothic literature, particularly that by women writers, gestured to the significance of a wider recognition of Griffith's fictional achievements. Arguing that ‘[a] history of

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
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Thefts, violence and sexual threats
Jenny DiPlacidi

also as a novel that, in spite of being relegated to a mere footnote in discussions of Jane Austen’s Northanger Abbey ( 1817 ) list of Gothic novels, is one that deserves recognition for raising questions of ownership, independence and the origins of desire. Radcliffe’s two most famous novels, The Mysteries of Udolpho ( 1794 ) and The Italian ( 1797 ), are essential works to examine in a

in Gothic incest
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Romances, novels, and the classifications of Irish Romantic fiction
Christina Morin

than not turns all forms of literature, factual or fictional, into latent threats. The final section of this chapter turns attention to one of the leading formal classifications of Romantic-era fiction that has led to the continued neglect of Irish gothic literature in this period: the recognition of the ‘national tale’ as distinct from ‘the Gothic novel’. Pioneered by Sydney Owenson, Lady Morgan in 1806, the national tale has become a major focal point in scholarship of Irish Romantic fiction, designated as a new literary form

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
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Cousins and the changing status of family
Jenny DiPlacidi

privileges choice while incidentally accommodating the family’s wishes. The complex genealogies that are unravelled throughout the novel eventually lead to recognition and familial acceptance for Madeline and her father, and the very complexity of the bonds of kinship makes Roche’s work fascinating. Family is represented at once as friend and foe, the seat of companionship and cheerful domesticity and

in Gothic incest
Re-examining paradigms of sibling incest
Jenny DiPlacidi

presented as either alike to the point of being interchangeable in looks, name and nature or as stark opposites. 14 In this respect, Gothic writers foreshadow many of the theories of geneticists regarding attraction and kinship recognition before their advancement. What seems scientific precognition on the part of eighteenth-century writers is rather the articulation of their understandings that bad and good blood is passed

in Gothic incest
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Female sexual agency and male victims
Jenny DiPlacidi

revere: his earnest words sound like the precepts of a tender parent: and, next to thee, methinks I could obey him”’ (p. 212). Adeliza’s comparison of her love for Edmund to that for her mother indicates that her passionate love is based partly in unconscious familial recognition. By loading their speeches with the language commonly preceding familial or incestuous revelations, Walpole provides the play

in Gothic incest
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‘Gothicism’, ‘historicism’, and the overlap of fictional modes from Thomas Leland to Walter Scott
Christina Morin

paired with a critique of contemporary British society effected by, in Watt's terms, ‘an idealizing appeal to the … past’, Strongbow's assertion of the value, worth, and hitherto unrecognised potential of the Irish people is striking. 71 It suggests that the key to future glory and restored national virtue lies in Ireland's recognition as an integral contributor to the British nation. Rather than dwell on what White admits was a barbaric, if only momentarily degraded, Irish society and culture, Earl Strongbow insists that the re-assertion of British greatness

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829
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Regina Maria Roche, the Minerva Press, and the bibliographic spread of Irish gothic fiction
Christina Morin

an endlessly duplicated object with very little value, literary or otherwise, ‘the disposable ephemera of an increasingly commercialized economy fed in no small measure by the mechanical printing press’. 80 The ‘sly smile[s]’ and gentle laughter with which Miss Elmere's assertions are met indicate Roche's recognition that her own Minerva Press novels could easily be dismissed as mere financially motivated imitations ( The monastery of St Columb , vol. 1, p. 268). Tellingly, the novel evidences a singular attention to doubles, material – like Miss Elmere's intended

in The gothic novel in Ireland, c. 1760–1829